Education

Education news is a priority for WWNO 's expanding local news reporting — providing trusted news for parents, educators and community leaders. 

Support for education reporting on WWNO comes from: Baptist Community Ministries, Entergy, The Hechinger Report, and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

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WRKF
3:02 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Communism and Crawfishing on Common Core

Originally published on Sun May 25, 2014 9:17 am

“I’m not a communist.”

But Senator Conrad Appel isn’t a happy camper, either. He took to the floor of the Senate Thursday to deliver a tirade directed toward Governor Bobby Jindal.

“You can call me a communist. You can call me a socialist fascist—that’s a good one,” Appel declared forcefully. “Anything you want to call me? Do it!”

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Education
8:45 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Student Essays Reveal Insights On Discipline, School Staffing

Credit Lissandra Melo / <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-121588291/stock-photo-locker-room.html?src=I5BauM-UKx4diJFZCV45vw-1-8">Shutterstock</a>

As the school year ends, education writer Sarah Carr sought a different approach to perspectives on schools.

She asked the students themselves to write opinion pieces on controversial topics: Discipline in schools, Teach for America teachers versus veteran educators, whether all students should go to a four-year college, and school desegregation.

Teenagers at the Bard Early College program submitted their thoughts, and The Hechinger Report has been publishing these essays.

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Education
5:00 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Most New Orleans Public School Grads Go To College, Stay In-State

Almost 60 percent of the college-bound New Orleans public school students entered college immediately after high school.
Sergio Rivas

The Lens reports that almost 70 percent of New Orleans public high school students in the class of 2012 went on to college. That number leads the state average by two percentage points.

Data comes from the nonprofit Educate Now website. The site released data this week about high school graduation rates in New Orleans.

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Education
8:00 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Behind The Test: Louisiana Grapples With How To 'Test' Its Youngest Learners

The babies at New Orleans' Kids of Excellence child care center sit down for meal time.
Credit Sarah Carr / WWNO

As the stakes grow higher for standardized tests, so too does the desire to test more students — including younger and younger ones. WWNO wraps up its series "Behind the Test."

The three-year-olds at Kids of Excellence child care center learn largely through play. Kristi Givens, the center’s director, tries to make sure they are ready for big school by the time they leave.

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Features
3:05 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

At A New Orleans High School, Marching Band Is A Lifeline For Kids

The Edna Karr High School marching band had fewer than 40 members four years ago. Today, more than 80 students march in the band.
Keith O'Brien NPR

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 2:31 pm

Editor's Note: This is a story about a high school band. It is a story that demands to be heard, even more so than read. Please click on the audio player, above, to listen. Audio will be available around 6:30 p.m. EDT.

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Education
8:00 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Behind The Test: Schools Turn To Social Workers, Relaxation Techniques To Deal With LEAP Test Strain

Kevin and Byroneshia doing a guided imagery activity. LEAP tests put entire schools under enormous stress.
Credit Mallory Falk / WWNO

WWNO continues its series "Behind the Test" with a look at standardized testing through the lens of test anxiety. In the weeks leading up to the LEAP test, teachers do a lot to prepare students: drilling them on crucial skills, giving out practice tests, even holding pep rallies to boost confidence. But what about preparing students to cope with test-related anxiety?

Brittany Healy is leading a small group of fifth graders in a guided imagery activity. They’re sprawled out on a couch and sunken into bean bag chairs. Eyes shut, arms loose at their sides.

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Education
8:50 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Behind The Test: The Rules And Regulations Leading To Reliable LEAP Data

Flickr user midnightpeace_90

WWNO continues its series “Behind the Test” with a look at test security. The paper booklets, and students’ answers inside, can determine things like teacher pay or the very existence of a school. It takes a lot of effort — and people — to keep the testing materials secure through delivery, administering the test, turning them in and then scoring.

The booklets and answer sheets for Louisiana’s LEAP tests come from a company called Data Recognition Corporation in Minnesota. When the Recovery School District's tests arrive they go straight to a warehouse.

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WRKF
3:02 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Mixed Feelings and Messages About Sex Education

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:19 am

Louisiana’s full House approved “Erin’s Law” on Monday. Approved in 20 other states, it requires schools to teach kids what constitutes sexual abuse and sexual assault. There was no debate, and the votes for passage were unanimous.

Tuesday, the House Education Committee began hearing a bill to require schools to teach comprehensive sex education. Baton Rouge Representative Patricia Smith is the author, and she made reference to the previous day’s approval of “Erin’s Law”.

“It came out of this committee; passed the House floor. My question to you is, how can you teach sexual assault without talking about sexual education?” Smith queried her fellow committee members.

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Code Switch
2:44 am
Wed May 14, 2014

New Orleans Police Hope To 'Win The City Back,' One Kid At A Time

New Orleans police investigate a shooting in February. Though the city's murder rate is down for a second straight year, it's still high compared with other cities.
Michael DeMocker The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 8:25 am

New Orleans is making progress toward losing the "murder capital" label. For a second straight year, homicides declined in the city, in keeping with a nationwide trend.

For African-Americans in the city, though, the numbers are less comforting. Of the nearly 350 killings in the past two years, 91 percent of the victims have been black. It's a cycle that's worrisome to the city's African-American community — and law enforcement.

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Latest News
5:10 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Civil Rights Complaints Target New Orleans Charter Schools

New Orleans charter schools are named in a federal civil rights complaint as being discriminatory against students of color.
frwl Wikimedia

A coalition of groups opposed to charter schools says it is filing federal civil rights complaints claiming discrimination by officials running school systems in New Orleans, Chicago and Newark, New Jersey.

Copies of the complaints were released today by the Journey for Justice Alliance. They say black students in the three cities suffer because of the closure of traditional public schools or the conversion of them into charter schools — run by independent organizations under charters approved by state or local education officials.

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