COASTAL DESK

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

FEMA Rebuffs DHS, To Continue Paying For New Orleans Katrina Damage

A federal audit says FEMA should stop sending money to the City of New Orleans for repairing road and water-system damage sustained during hurricanes Katrina and Rita almost 12 years ago. FEMA disagrees with the findings, and the city plans to press forward with repairs. In order to get money from FEMA to repair its streets and sewer lines, the City had to prove the damage was caused directly by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. After reviewing documents and consulting with engineers, FEMA agreed. I t pledged to give the city $2.04 billion in December 2015.

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THE LISTENING POST

The Listening Post Asks: How Should We Deal With The Opioid Crisis?

In 2016 there were more drug related deaths than murders in New Orleans. Mostly due to opioids. Mayor Landrieu says he has a plan to deal with the growing national opioid epidemic. The Listening Post turned it's attention to opioids and asked: 1) What evidence of the opioid epidemic have you seen? How has it impacted you? 2) What would you do if someone you knew was addicted to opioids, like heroin or oxycodone? 3) What strategies would help communities better deal with drug epidemics? Here's...

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McCain Votes No, Dealing Potential Death Blow To Republican Health Care Efforts

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWeayFHsH90 In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it. In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure. McCain, who was diagnosed with brain cancer and returned to Washington to advance the health care bill, turned around and bucked his party's leadership — and President...

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This week on All Things New Orleans we share an episode of the Listening Post, which focuses on the impact of the national opioid epidemic. Then, we'll discuss a civic engagement social featuring Mayor Mitch Landrieu hosted by Engage NOLA. 

And, we share another story from Bring Your Own, a live story-telling series. 

 Civil Rights activists sit in protest at Woolworth’s lunch counter in Durham, North Carolina, February 10, 1960.
Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina / State Archives of North Carolina

The South has a rich and varied food history, but too often it's reduced to stereotype. On this week's show, we explore the influence of the South on America’s culinary identity, and the central role African-American and immigrant cooks played in its formation. 

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A federal audit says FEMA should stop sending money to the City of New Orleans for repairing road and water-system damage sustained during hurricanes Katrina and Rita almost 12 years ago.

 

FEMA disagrees with the findings, and the city plans to press forward with repairs.

 

In order to get money from FEMA to repair its streets and sewer lines, the City had to prove the damage was caused directly by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. After reviewing documents and consulting with engineers, FEMA agreed. It pledged to give the city $2.04 billion in December 2015.

American Routes Shortcuts: Mavis Staples

7 hours ago
Mavis Staples
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek of the upcoming show. This week, it’s the second installment of our program all about Bob Dylan.  Here’s host Nick Spitzer with Mavis Staples, on American Routes.

NS: Bob Dylan admired the civil rights songs of the Staples singers,  and would hear them on tour in the early 60s. Mavis Staples remembers when her father, Pops, heard Dylan for the first time, and how Dylan’s protest lyrics influenced their family in return.

A shawarma wrap from the Uptown eatery Shawarma on the Go.
Ian McNulty

Let's say you’re from New Orleans but living somewhere else. You are presented with a po-boy. Naturally, you are skeptical. You know that a po-boy is not merely a sandwich. It's a taste of home, and that taste comes through in the particulars. 

The type of bread, the way it's dressed, the way the roast beef is cooked, the seafood is fried and the hot sausage is spiced. These are the things that add up to make regional specialties distinctive.

I recently learned how the same idea applies to shawarma, particularly the chicken shawarma wrap, that staple of Arabic restaurants around New Orleans and everywhere else for that matter.

George Porter Jr.
Music Inside Out

When George Porter, Jr. was a child, he wanted to become a Catholic priest. But an uncomfortably silent church retreat and an encounter with neighborhood blues musicians helped Porter find his musical calling.

He turned to funk and never looked back.

As the bass player for The Meters, Porter helped create a body of music in the 1960s and 70s that still resonates as some of the funkiest grooves ever recorded.

So what’s the secret to funk?

In 2016 there were more drug related deaths than murders in New Orleans. Mostly due to opioids. Mayor Landrieu says he has a plan to deal with the growing national opioid epidemic. The Listening Post turned it's attention to opioids and asked:

1) What evidence of the opioid epidemic have you seen? How has it impacted you?

2) What would you do if someone you knew was addicted to opioids, like heroin or oxycodone? 

3) What strategies would help communities better deal with drug epidemics?

École Bilingue

In a city that takes its name from the center of France, learning French as a second language seems intuitive. École Bilingue of New Orleans begins its French immersion program in early childhood, with the goal of ushering along global citizens. The school’s director of admissions, Courtney Kloor, sat down with NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford to talk about summer at École Bilingue, as well as the fast approaching back-to-school season.  

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you this conversation on growing up in New Orleans.

The Uncertain Future Of Flood Insurance

Jul 25, 2017
orientalizing/via Flickr (Creative Commons 2.0)

Since last August, the popularity of flood insurance has again surged in Louisiana, but the future of the debt-laden National Flood Insurance Program is uncertain. Since 2005, the program has racked up $24.6 billion dollars in liability to the U.S. Treasury, mostly due to claims after Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, and the Great Louisiana Flood of 2016. That’s just one way that Louisiana’s past is influencing the federal program’s future.

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FOOD & DINING

 Civil Rights activists sit in protest at Woolworth’s lunch counter in Durham, North Carolina, February 10, 1960.
Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina / State Archives of North Carolina

Louisiana Eats: Nourishing Change

The South has a rich and varied food history, but too often it's reduced to stereotype. On this week's show, we explore the influence of the South on America’s culinary identity, and the central role African-American and immigrant cooks played in its formation.

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WWNO's Travel Krewe Is Going To Bella Italia

Join WWNO New Orleans Public Radio, and a like-minded group of curious travelers for a journey rich in the art, architecture, food, wine, and music of la bella Italia.

LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For The Week Of July 23, 2017

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer has a new The Appresidentice , The Week in Trumpland , News of the Atom , What the Frack? , News of the Godly , The Apologies of the Week , and more!

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