TOP STORY

The U.S. Declared War On Veteran Homelessness — And It Actually Could Win

This is a tale of two cities. In New Orleans, there are signs of hope that veteran homelessness can be solved. But Los Angeles presents a very different picture. Under the deafening highway noise of the Pontchartrain Expressway in central city New Orleans, Ronald Engberson, 54, beds down for the night. Engberson got out of the Marines in 1979, plagued even back then by problems with drugs and alcohol. He says that's mostly the reason he's been homeless the past 10 years."My longest stretch...
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NPR NEWS

Play Hard, Live Free: Where Wild Play Still Rules

Braden Swenson wanders into a semi-rickety wooden shed on his search for gold, treasure and riches. "Is there any treasure in here?" he asks in the endearing dialect of a 4-year-old. "I've been looking everywhere for them. I can't find any." The proto-pirate toddler conducts a quick search, then wanders away to continue his quest elsewhere.Not far away, Ethan Lipsie, age 9, clutches a framing hammer and a nine-penny nail. He's ready to hang his freshly painted sign on a wooden "fort" he's...
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KATRINA: THE DEBRIS

Elizabeth Mahoney, St. Bernard resident and peer counselor.
Brett Anderson

Katrina: The Debris // Mental Health

The devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed is most visible in pictures of ruined houses and people’s destroyed possessions lying out on city streets. But there’s unseen damage that runs even deeper: the collective emotional trauma experienced by the thousands of people who lived through it.
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LOUISIANA EATS!

Public Domain / Wikipedia

Louisiana Eats: Beach Bums And Barbecue

For some, Louisiana summers mean oppressive heat and thick humidity. For others, it means backyard barbecues and ice cold cocktails! On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we bask in the sunshine as we look at locally produced rum, outdoor grilling, and the recent resurgence of interest Tiki cocktails.
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10 YEARS LATER

Ghosts Of Katrina Still Haunt New Orleans' Shattered Lower Ninth Ward

The flooded streets and destroyed homes of the New Orleans neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward were among the most powerful and iconic images from Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath 10 years ago.Now, much of New Orleans is back — more than half of the city's neighborhoods have recovered some 90 percent of their pre-storm population.That's not the case for the Lower Ninth.Today, there's a feeling of desolation on nearly every block of the predominantly African-American neighborhood.One...
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Christian and Grace Wilson Birch began dating in the summer of 2008 and were married in the fall of 2013.
Grace Wilson Birch

After New Orleans flooded in 2005, documentary filmmakers flocked to the city to tell its story. The city was still getting back on its feet when a film crew spoke with Grace Wilson Birch, a communication associate for the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation.

When the movie was finally released, Grace was depicted as being in the dark about economic disparities in New Orleans. She remembers watching the film reluctantly with Christian Birch, her boyfriend at the time.

Banking on a New Orleans recovery

11 hours ago
Noel King and Caitlin Esch

Alden McDonald, the President and CEO of Liberty Bank, takes a pair of work boots from the trunk of his car and paces the perimeter of a branch that's under construction in New Orleans' Gentilly neighborhood. He lobs question after question at his contractors: what's the square footage on the restrooms? Where will the tellers sit? Is it possible to remove one wall and add some open space? McDonald is nothing if not persistent. It's a character trait that helped when Liberty faced its most trying time.

Thomas Howley, Captain, New Orleans Fire Department, on safety measures taken during search and rescue missions.

Interview by Mark Cave for The Historic New Orleans Collection, April 28, 2006.

The Katrina Files feature the perspectives of first responders who worked in New Orleans in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

When Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast 10 years ago, the eye of the storm made landfall near a tiny speck of a town at the mouth of the Pearl River on the Louisiana border with Mississippi.

To say Katrina — one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history — nearly wiped Pearlington, Miss., off the map isn't entirely true. The fact is, Pearlington was so small that it wasn't even on many maps.

Ten years ago this month Hurricane Katrina tore through New Orleans and more than a thousand people died. A quarter of a million more fled their homes, which were damaged or destroyed in the devastating floods.

A lot has changed in the past decade, but the recovery has been uneven. White residents are doing better than they were before the storm hit, while African Americans are struggling to catch up from the storm's aftermath.

Ten years ago this month, the monster storm Hurricane Katrina thundered through New Orleans and coastal Mississippi and Alabama. Many who survived the storm and its aftermath are still feeling its terrible impact.

This week on For the Record: Hurricane Katrina's mark on one family, 10 years later.

In 2005, sisters Regina and Talitha Halley had just moved out of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans into a new house on Spain Street. Regina, now 33, took care of her sister full time while their mom worked as a professional caregiver.

Elizabeth Mahoney, St. Bernard resident and peer counselor.
Brett Anderson

The devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed is most visible in pictures of ruined houses and people’s destroyed possessions lying out on city streets. But there’s unseen damage that runs even deeper: the collective emotional trauma experienced by the thousands of people who lived through it.

The flooded streets and destroyed homes of the New Orleans neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward were among the most powerful and iconic images from Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath 10 years ago.

Now, much of New Orleans is back — more than half of the city's neighborhoods have recovered some 90 percent of their pre-storm population.

That's not the case for the Lower Ninth.

Today, there's a feeling of desolation on nearly every block of the predominantly African-American neighborhood.

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: Karzai Talk, News of the Olympic Movement, Follow the Dollar, News of the Atom, News of AFPAC, News of the Warm, and more!

Musical instruments produce their sound in many ways. This program is devoted to two instruments: one that's plucked (the harpsichord), and one that's bowed (the cello).

Harpsichord music by Francois Couperin (1668-1733) is performed by New Orleans-born Skip Sempe, and solo suites for cello by Bach are performed by Tess Remy-Schumacher.

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CLASSICAL MUSIC

Classical Music on WWNO

Beautiful classical music, from traditional to contemporary, on WWNO and WWNO2.

LOUISIANA STATE NEWS

Dardenne Calls for Payback

Jay Dardenne is urging payback from a couple of fellow Republicans.“David’s got a lot of money in the super PAC. Bobby’s got a lot of money in super PACs and taxpayers of Louisiana ought not be having to fund those efforts. That’s the point I’m really making,” Dardenne said of his call for David Vitter and Bobby Jindal to reimburse the state of Louisiana.
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LE SHOW

Le Show For The Week Of Aug. 2, 2015

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: Karzai Talk, News of the Olympic Movement, Follow the Dollar, News of the Atom, News of AFPAC, News of the Warm, and more!
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