Tulane University

Outside the Wire productions

    A performance is planned at Tulane University this week that brings ancient Greek tragedy to modern-day veterans. Eileen Fleming reports it’s also a public health project.

NASA and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

New Orleans astronomy buffs have a new place to take in the wonders of outer space. The Tulane Observatory will now be open to the public once a month. Renee Peck recently spoke with Dr. Dan Purrington, Professor Emeritus of Physics, about this new opportunity to view the skies.


Christy George is concerned that too many Americans are in denial about climate change and is trying a find a new approach to change their minds. She believes that people join social movements once they’re convinced it’s the right thing to do, so she’s collecting personal stories from locals who have been impacted by rising tides and temperatures for her new book, My Vanishing Hometowns.

As health officials around the world study how the Zika virus is spreading, a Tulane researcher says New Orleans has some extra time to prepare.

An effective and non-addictive painkiller has been developed by researchers at Tulane University with the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System. The new compound has been in the works since a 1997 discovery of a brain receptor.

A new study involving a Tulane expert on child psychology shows that quality foster care can help reverse damage done to abused boys. Without the intervention, children can become callous and unemotional.

Tulane University researchers are leading a study examining the long-term effects of Hurricane Katrina. The national project will examine the health effects of the storm, who came back, and where they are now.

National Geographic

A Tulane professor was part of an international team that discovered and documented a new species of human ancestors found in South Africa. It’s the largest find of human-related fossils ever made in Africa.

It's blazingly hot outside and five summer fellows from the Tulane City Center are standing in a playground at a youth center in New Orleans. The architecture students diplomatically describe the playground's design as "unintentional": There's no grass, trees or even much shade, and it's surrounded by a chain-link fence topped with barbed wire. The students, both graduate and undergraduate, are there to make the playground a little nicer.

"Right now, it feels like a prison," says Maggie Hansen, the center's interim director.

A Tulane University researcher recently back from Sierra Leone in West Africa says health care workers treating patients with Lassa Fever are taking precautions similar to those used in the Ebola outbreak. But the risk of a Lassa epidemic is much less than the dangers posed by Ebola cases in that region.