technology

A company started by a retired engineer from Many, Louisiana, Suns River Technology, is one of eight research groups in the world nominated for the Desal Prize, announced this month.

Hill Kemp, 74, uses solar still technology to purify brackish groundwater and make it safe for drinking.

This competition was set up by USAID, in partnership with the governments of Sweden and The Netherlands. The teams must produce enough water for a farm family in the Jordanian desert.

To keep a better eye on head injuries in the past, the LSU football team has had concussion detectors installed in players’ helmets. This season, LSU became the first team in the NCAA to try high-tech mouth guards to measure hits.


University of New Orleans / UNO

Seventh and eighth graders participated in the very first UNO Space Day on Thursday. The event was co-hosted by NASA, Boeing Company, the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM), and Jacobs Technology.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - PNNL / Flickr

Computer experts from around the world are meeting this week in New Orleans for the annual Supercomputing Conference, or SC14.

This year, the conference has a clear focus: HPC matters. HPC is high performance computing, which organizers say is “making the world better” through innovation.  

Wilfred Pinfold is the HPC matters chair. He says supercomputers can help solve problems in health care and finance, and in issues important to New Orleaneans — like weather prediction and climate modeling.

Steve Petrucelli / Flickr

The video game industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the United States. One of the biggest gaming trade groups, Washington, DC-based Entertainment Software Association, released a report Tuesday about the economic impact of the computer and video game industries in each state.

Louisiana’s computer and video game industry paid workers more than $14 million in 2012, according to the study.

Janaya Williams / WWNO

Digital currencies like Bitcoin and Litecoin don’t enjoy widespread use yet. It turns out, most retail stores and consumers still prefer good old fashioned paper money.

But the currency is catching on with a few mavericks around the globe — including some innovative business owners right here in New Orleans.

At a few local stores, customers can open their virtual Bitcoin wallets to buy everything from antique jewelry and furniture — to french fries and po-boys.

Innovation and technology reporting on WWNO is supported by Bellwether Technology.

A flying dune buggy has Shreveport roots.

Startup flying car maker SkyRunner LLC is moving into the former Shreveport General Motors plant this week. An assembly line is being prepped for a pre-market, all-terrain vehicle with a powered parachute.

Google has named Mandeville the most wired business community in Louisiana for the second year in a row, NOLA.com reports.

Google’s annual “eCity Award” recognizes the strongest online business communities around the country. A number of factors determined the winning cities, including the likelihood of small businesses to have a website.

In a news release, a Google representative called Mandeville “a prime example of how innovation and growth in e-commerce can successfully contribute to bolstering economic progress.”

Billy Brown / Flickr

As New Orleans continues to build its reputation as a hub for innovation and new technologies, WWNO’s Technology Desk seeks to highlight innovators who are finding novel solutions to some of the city’s most important issues.

Innovations Reporter Janaya Williams recently spoke with Lauren Rudzis of Community Plates, a nonprofit that is tapping into the resources of the food and restaurant community in New Orleans to find a new system to deliver food to the hungry.

Keoni Cabral / Flickr

NOLA Tech Week starts on Monday. It's the second year for the citywide event, which bills itself as a "celebration of all things tech.”

These days, New Orleans is making a name for itself as the place to be for technology start-ups — it was recently called the "most improved city for business” by the Wall Street Journal, and Forbes says it’s the number-three city for information technology job growth.

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