It's the epic quest of campers everywhere: How do you get the perfectly toasted marshmallow? In our inaugural installment of NPR's Summer Science series, we gave some guidance on the first key ingredient: how to build the campfire. (Later this summer, we'll attempt to answer the vexing question of how to stave off brain freeze.)

Summer living is supposed to be easy — school is out, the days are long, the traffic eases. But it's not all inner tubes and lemonade: Summer can throw us some curveballs, too. How can I avoid sunburn? What can I do to stave off that brain freeze? Why do my s'mores always burn?

Fear not; NPR is here to help. As part of our new Summer Science series, we'll turn to science to tackle these vexing questions, starting with how to build the perfect campfire.

Summer Science: An Introduction

May 28, 2012

David Greene speaks with NPR's Joe Palca about Morning Edition's upcoming series, "Summer Science."

Loyola University

Exposure to organic foods can influence moral thinking and doing, according to a new study from Loyola University.

Trophy buck shot in Midwest fathering fawns in Louisiana

May 13, 2012

A trophy whitetail buck shot and killed in Illinois is fathering fawns in Louisiana.

A half-dozen does are pregnant because hunter Mike Toney remembered a study done years ago at Louisiana State University, called the researcher and drove all night to get the animal's testicles to him. Though Jesse Saenz is now studying cats for his doctorate, he spent a Sunday in November extracting and freezing deer semen.

A total of 16 does were inseminated; six became pregnant and are expected to give birth as early as next week.