schools

Andre Natta / Southern Education Desk

Florida has about 650 charter schools. They're part of school districts but are privately managed and largely free of many of the rules governing traditional public schools. But as enrollment in charters has increased, so has the financial cost.

WFSU's Lynn Hatter reports for the Southern Education Desk that Tennessee and Georgia are also struggling to find ways to support their charter schools.

Amy Jeffries / Southern Education Desk

The big push for charter schools in Louisiana started after Hurricane Katrina. The state's Recovery School District took over most of the public schools in New Orleans, and quickly issued charters.

With charter school enrollment up to nearly 3 million nationwide last year, Louisiana was still among the states adding the most students.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Charter schools are changing American education. Some say for the better, some say for the worse. This week the Southern Education Desk looks at the charter school movement throughout the south: the similarities and differences between states, and a glimpse at what's ahead. The series starts in New Orleans, the testing ground for the charter movement. Nearly all the city's public schools have been converted into charters: publicly funded, but privately run. Since then, a major lesson has emerged.

Charting New Orleans' charter school experiment

Aug 13, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

It's been 10-years since Hurricane Katrina and the flood-of-floods struck New Orleans. In the following decade, the city has transformed it public schools, housing, and business community. Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio traveled to the city to explore what these vast changes mean for New Orleans and the country. 

Student performance has improved in the years since Hurricane Katrina, according to researchers at Tulane University. The Education Research Alliance released new findings on Tuesday.

The report looks at student performance on state tests. It finds a typical student's scores rose 8 to 15 points.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many school leaders and policymakers are weighing in on New Orleans' education system. But what about families? At a recent panel, parents took to the stage to reflect on the past 10 years.

Eight parents were featured speakers on the panel. They talked about enrollment, governance and accountability.

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many reporters are looking at post storm progress through the lens of New Orleans' education system. Two recent articles in particular caught WWNO education reporter Mallory Falk's eye. Falk spoke to Danielle Dreilinger of NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune and Emmanuel Felton, a staff writer for The Hechinger Report, about their recent looks into discipline and corruption in New Orleans schools.

Wednesday kicks off late enrollment for most New Orleans public schools.
Mallory Falk / WWNO

Wednesday kicked off late enrollment for most New Orleans public schools. Hundreds of families stopped by Dillard University throughout the day. Some missed earlier deadlines or just moved to the city. Others already got placements but wanted to try for a different school.

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina ushered in massive change to New Orleans' education system. What lessons have we learned since then? Today the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans (ERA) kicks off a conference trying to answer that question. ERA's director, Douglas Harris, sat down with WWNO's Mallory Falk to discuss how the conference - and his organization - came about.

Support for education reporting on WWNO comes from Baptist Community Ministries and Entergy Corporation.

Cherice Harrison-Nelson

After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, all 7,500 employees of the New Orleans school system were fired. That led to an unprecedented diaspora of schoolteachers. New research suggests that only a small fraction of them continue to teach in the city’s schools today.

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