public health

In the past three years combined, St. Tammany Parish has had 13 homicides. During that same period of time, more than 100 residents committed suicide. Rebecca Thees with Volunteers of America has been on the front line of the parish’s efforts to curb this growing crisis.

More than a thousand people are expected to get free medical care today from a non-profit setting up at the Convention Center. It was moved up earlier than usual this year because of the Essence Festival.

More than a thousand people without health insurance are expected to attend a free one-day clinic in New Orleans next week. It’s the fourth visit to the city by a national nonprofit since Hurricane Katrina.

A new report finds that Louisiana has the second worst dentist shortage in the nation. Because of this, many residents are not getting adequate dental care, especially children and people who live in rural areas.

The Pew Charitable Trusts examined the lack of access to dental care nationwide. The findings revealed a scarcity of dentists who participate in Medicaid. In Louisiana, the report comes as the state Department of Health and Hospitals is slashing reimbursement rates paid to dentists through the Medicaid program with the July 1start of the new fiscal year.

It’s been almost a year since the Arc of Acadiana was awarded the state contract to privatize a Bossier City residential facility for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A total of 390 employees of the former Northwest Supports and Services Center were invited to reapply for jobs. For director April Lee, it was not just about keeping her job. As the administrator, her house on the 100-acre grounds was on the line, too.

An organization formed to help people fleeing the Vietnam War establish themselves in the U.S. is now helping a Gulf Coast community deal with the impact of much more recent history.

My, how we love our characters in New Orleans. Which is a good thing. 

Locals still talk about Ruthie the Duck Girl, even though she died in 2008. In my neighborhood of Tremé, we have a tall man with a scraggly beard who pushes a grocery cart around, having random conversations with a street corner. Or an empty can. 

We celebrate these characters. We tenderly laugh with them. But we don’t always see that, underneath the eccentricity that makes for a funny story, is often a mental illness that is anything but funny.

Dr. Karen Elkind-Hirsch is part of a group of researchers from Pennington Biomedical Research Center and Woman's Hospital who will be following 306 pregnant women with smartphones.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

New Orleans is one of six cities in the United States to receive the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Road Maps to Health Prize, a $25,000 award dedicated to improving health at the population level.

Shreveport Medical Students Treat 1,300 Kenyans

Mar 11, 2013

A group of medical school students from LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport recently returned from Africa where they provided medical treatment to 1,300 people living in a remote area of Kenya. The students work through a nonprofit they formed several years ago and partner with other global mission organizations. According to Dr. Lisa Hodges, assistant professor of pediatrics and medicine, the students hold fundraisers throughout the year and purchase medicine to take with them during the month-long health mission.