politics

Common Core: Blame Lies With Name?

Apr 1, 2015

A poll conducted by LSU finds that state residents largely oppose education standards that are called Common Core, but support the overall concept.  

Results showed that only 39 percent of respondents said they support Common Core.  

But LSU Public Policy Research Lab Director Dr. Michael Henderson says there was a significant difference when the question dropped the label. "When you ask about the same program, but take out the name, 67 percent support it," he said.

The House Appropriations committee combed through the Department of Corrections budget Tuesday, and testimony confirmed what many criminal justice reform advocates have long said: this state has the nation’s highest per capita incarceration rate.

Marrero Rep. Patrick Connick pitched the big question.

“The inmates, in 27 years, have increased 110 percent. And the population of Louisiana has increased 9 percent over the same period. How do you explain that?” Connick asked Corrections Secretary Jimmy LeBlanc.

Expenses for the governor's state police security detail have gone up under Gov. Bobby Jindal, as he travels across the country raising his profile for a possible presidential campaign.

Col. Mike Edmonson, the head of the Louisiana State Police, says his agency spent $2.2 million on travel expenses related to Jindal's protective detail this year.

He says that level has stayed consistent in recent years. But it's up from $1.5 million for former Gov. Kathleen Blanco and $1 million for former Gov. Mike Foster.

“You have to remember what you may be losing in the higher education system as you go into deeper cuts,” warns Public Affairs Research Council president Robert Travis Scott.

Scott addressed the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday, focusing on PAR’s new report, “Innovation in Louisiana”, which analyzes state support for university research programs. Those programs bring in grant money up front, and licensing revenue from patents for years afterwards. Scott notes that continued state budget cuts to higher education are impacting the amounts and numbers of research grants Louisiana’s universities are able to access.

Legislators Urged To Support Higher Ed

Mar 30, 2015

Legislators, city officials, and business leaders spoke to University of Louisiana at Monroe students, faculty, and community members about proposed cuts to the state's public colleges and universities.  The forum was hosted by the ULM Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, and Student Government Association.

“Is your hospital next?” asked a sign prominently displayed during a February 11 rally on the state Capitol steps, protesting the planned closure of Baton Rouge General’s Mid-City Emergency Room. With that ER shutting down tomorrow—an unintended consequence of privatizing Louisiana’s charity hospital system—it’s a question that continues to trouble Baton Rouge Rep. Patricia Smith.

We know their public personas, but what do Louisiana’s statewide elected officials do when they’re off the clock?

Attorney General Buddy Caldwell does Elvis.

Louisiana’s top lawyer actually puts on the bedazzled jumpsuit and performs as an Elvis impersonator in his spare time. It’s not a new gig for him: Caldwell says music has always been a part of his life.

Travers Mackel / WDSU-TV

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu — backed by a crowd of politicians, police officials and business leaders — presented a new French Quarter security plan on Wednesday, March 25 on the steps of the 8th District police precinct on Royal Street.

The House Appropriations Committee continues to take testimony on the governor’s budget proposal this week, but something isn’t adding up. When DOTD came to the table Tuesday, Appropriations chairman Jim Fannin started questioning purported savings from the disappearance of 33 jobs.

Imagine this: it’s a cool autumn Saturday night, and there’s no football in Tiger Stadium. In fact, there’s no LSU football at all, because the state’s flagship university is closed for the year. LSU System President F. King Alexander says the possibility is real.

“This budget reduction is so large, we’d have to furlough everybody for an entire year,” Alexander told the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday.

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