Music

JazzSet
4:09 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Branford Marsalis Quartet On JazzSet

The Branford Marsalis Quartet.
Eric Ryan Anderson

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 9:36 am

From January 1992 to September 2001, Branford Marsalis set the JazzSet pace, hosting 39 new shows a year (now we do 26) from the Carnegie Hall Jazz Band; festivals in Iowa City, Telluride, Pasadena, Mount Hood, Montreal and Brevard, N.C.; the new music festival in Groningen, the Netherlands, and the Havana Jazz Festival in Cuba; clubs from Yoshi's in California to Sculler's and the Regattabar in Boston. WGBH producer Steve Schwartz sent us lots of Boston sets during that first decade, all of them much appreciated.

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Music Reviews
2:39 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Cat Power Rips It Up, Starts Again

Chan Marshall, better known by the name Cat Power, takes a new approach on her latest record, Sun.
Stefano Giovannini Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 6:09 pm

I recently listened to the first single from the new Cat Power album with some fellow fans, and the room was deeply divided. Some thought the song was fabulous, but others were startled and upset — which I could understand, sort of. Chan Marshall's songs generally speak to pain and trauma with a hushed and intimate musical vocabulary. But this song, "Ruin," was different — not just a rock 'n' roll song, but one you might even want to dance to.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Jeremy Davenport: A Man & His Horn

  • Jeremy Davenport — A Man & His Horn

When jazz trumpeter Jeremy Davenport got off the road to take a lengthy engagement at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in New Orleans, he said no one seemed more surprised than his former boss — Harry Connick Jr. Davenport had traveled the world in Connick's band, which was and remains, hot stuff.

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Music Reviews
11:14 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Harmony, Teenagers And 'The Complete Story Of Doo-Wop'

Vocal groups like The Ink Spots went on for decades, often without a single member of the original group appearing with them.
Fred Ramage Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:31 am

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Joe South, Of 'Games People Play' Fame, Dies

Joe South, in 2009.
Rick Diamond Getty Images
  • A clip of Joe South, singing 'Games People Play'
  • A clip from Deep Purple doing 'Hush'

Joe South, who wrote such '60s and '70s hits as Games People Play and (I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack at his home in Buford, Ga. He was 72.

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Hunter Hayes
8:29 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Country music's rising star returns to Louisiana

Hunter Hayes knows a thing or two about hurricanes.

The south Louisiana native has seen his share of storms and even named his breakout country music single "Storm Warning" — about a beautiful girl he compares to a "Cat 5" hurricane.

On Friday, the accordion-playing, harmonica-blowing singer returns to Louisiana as the area cleans up from Hurricane Isaac for a concert benefiting a New Orleans hospital. He's also scheduled to sing the national anthem at the New Orleans Saints football game against the Washington Redskins on Sunday — his 21st birthday.

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Music News
3:36 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

Music Is Everywhere: John Cage At 100

John Cage during his 1966 concert at the opening of the National Arts Foundation in Washington, D.C.
Rowland Scherman Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 5:05 pm

OK, let's get the elephant out of the room right away. John Cage's most famous, or infamous, work is "4'33"," in which a musician walks onstage and sits at the piano for 4 minutes and 33 seconds.

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Around the Nation
2:24 am
Wed September 5, 2012

The Strange Story Of The Man Behind 'Strange Fruit'

Abel Meeropol watches as his sons, Robert and Michael, play with a train set.
Courtesy of Robert and Michael Meeropol

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 2:37 pm

One of Billie Holiday's most iconic songs is "Strange Fruit," a haunting protest against the inhumanity of racism. Many people know that the man who wrote the song was inspired by a photograph of a lynching. But they might not realize that he's also tied to another watershed moment in America's history.

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Music Reviews
11:03 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Miguel Zenon And Laurent Coq Play 'Hopscotch'

Miguel Zenon.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 1:57 pm

The new quartet album by alto saxophonist Miguel Zenón and pianist Laurent Coq is called Rayuela, which means "hopscotch." It's named for Julio Cortázar's novel, the fragmented tale of a wandering bohemian and his social circles in Parisian exile, as well as back home in Buenos Aires.

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Music Interviews
11:05 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

Alanis Morissette On Anger, Fame And Motherhood

Alanis Morissette's Havoc and Bright Lights is the singer's eighth studio album.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 5:57 pm

A lot has changed for Alanis Morissette in the past two decades. Raised Catholic in Ottawa, she spent much of her youth believing she couldn't sing. When she began her music career as a teenager, it was as a dance-pop artist — and, briefly, Vanilla Ice's opening act. Finally, in 1995, she released Jagged Little Pill, an international smash that made Morissette an overnight celebrity, won her an armload of Grammy awards and left her with a "scorned woman" image that she hasn't shaken since.

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