music

Ashe Cultural Arts Center

This week on Inside the Arts... a sneak peek at the Orpheum Theater as the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra returns to its concert home a decade post-Katrina.

Then, Southern Rep opens its new season with acclaimed playwright Sarah Ruhl's romantic comedy, Stage Kiss.

And, we round out with Ashé to Amen, a unique gallery experience exploring the enduring spirituality of people of African descent at the Ashé Cultural Arts Center and Power House.

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. 

Continuum presents excerpts from the 12th century manuscript, Carmina Burana (The Songs from Beuern). This medieval manuscript was discovered in 1803 in the library of the Bavarian Benedictine monastery of Benedictbeuern in southern Germany.

Luke Winslow-King
Matt Robinson / Elephant Quilt Productions

What do you get when you combine modern jazz, the music of Woody Guthrie, Delta blues, and Antonín Dvořák’s “American” String Quartet?

You get Luke Winslow-King.

Born and raised in Michigan, a crime landed him in New Orleans. But, ever the optimist, Winslow-King decided to stay. Luke Winslow-King’s talent has drawn aggressive praise. One music lover, who was moved to weep while listening, slapped Winslow-King at the end of the song.

When Stephen Colbert takes over the Late Show tonight on CBS, he'll have a new partner in crime on stage: pianist Jon Batiste.

Music performed by one of Americas leading early music ensembles, The Waverly Consort, is presented on this Continuum.

Three of their CDs are featured, presenting music from the Cantigas de Santa Maria of Alfonso X, some of the songs of 14th century French composer Guillaume de Machaut, and the complete Llibre Vermell (The Red Book), a collection of ten pilgrim songs of the late 14th Century.

Rickie Lee Jones: The Other Side Of Desire
MusicInsideOut.org

Rickie Lee Jones says she moved to New Orleans, in part, because she wanted to be around people. In Los Angeles, she was mostly around cars.

So far, so good. People from New Orleans — either real or imagined — are all over her latest effort, “The Other Side of Desire.” And one of Jones’ neighbors here even helped inspire a song on the album.

More than 20 years into Lil Wayne's career, the froggy-voiced, diminutive rapper is hardly ever described as an elder statesman.

Continuum presents a program by the outstanding early music ensemble Sequentia, now in its thirty-eighth year of performing medieval music, some of which has been hitherto unknown.

This program focuses of two major works from around the year 1200, The Story of Samson & Delilah and The Labors of Hercules. These two pieces are in the form of narrative lais, a medieval type of story telling in a vocal style prevalent in medieval times.

There are a lot of stories to tell about New Orleans.

There are uplifting stories about new houses, new shops and gigantic drainage projects. There are melancholy stories about everything residents lost in Hurricane Katrina, about all that can never be recovered. There are stories about all that remains to be done, 10 years after the hurricane and the levee failures.

And, throughout it all, there are love stories.

Want to hear one?

'It Was Still Mardi Gras'

DJ Session: The Music Of New Orleans, 10 Years After Katrina

Aug 28, 2015

As the nation marks 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, Here & Now has a special New Orleans edition of the DJ Sessions. Host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Nick Spitzer, a New Orleans resident and host of “American Routes,” from Tulane University and WWNO in New Orleans, distributed by PRX. He talks about the music that has resonated in the city since the storm, and how the music scene has changed.

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