mental health

Tom W. Sulcer

 

The Therapeutic Day Program provides space and services for kids with severe mental and behavioral health needs in New Orleans. Former WWNO reporter Mallory Falk checked in with the school back in 2015, and today NolaVie's Kelley Crawford welcomes back Elizabeth Marcell and Monica Stevens to discuss what changes and developments have come to the school since then.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Arcane Melancholia'

Feb 17, 2017
Jess Pinkham

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Whole Village Art Therapy, Inc.

Holly Wherry is an artist, counselor, and community advocate who has created a way to blend her skills and enthusiasm into one non-profit. It is called Whole Village Art Therapy, and it is an organization that lives up to that hefty name. NolaVie's Kelley Crawford spoke with Holly to learn about art therapy and how it is becoming part of the New Orleans community.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford. 

This week we have the latest episode of WWNO’s community engagement project The Listening Post. To kick of 2017, the team asked folks around New Orleans about the stigma of mental health in their communities and what self-care tips they recommend for keeping it together.

The Listening Post's questions for January are:

What is the BIGGEST cause of stress in your life?

What self care methods do you rely on to combat stress? 

The state health department has agreed to provide more bed space for Louisiana inmates found incompetent to stand trial and those found not guilty of crimes by reason of insanity. 

Mallory Falk / WWNO

School is back in session. And there's a new option for students with severe mental and behavioral health needs: the New Orleans Therapeutic Day Program. The program recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony.

Lisa Richardson, left, is the Director of Research & Evaluation at the Institute of Women & Ethnic Studies. Denese Shervington, right, is its President & CEO.
StoryCorps

For a couple of years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans’ narrative belonged to the people who endured the storm and those who helped rebuild after it. But as time went on and the city recovered, things changed. New demographics emerged and people started talking about “the new New Orleans.”

These changes left many people, including psychiatrist Denese Shervington and urban anthropologist Lisa Richardson, wondering about the city’s new identity and their place in it.

Insight: Dr. Beau Clark

Aug 14, 2015

The Lafayette theatre shootings last month brought the issues of mental health commitments and gun rights to the forefront once again. In Louisiana, coroners are often involved in initiating the process that can lead to long-term commitment. East Baton Rouge Coroner Dr. Beau Clark speaks with Sue Lincoln about the safeguards and pitfalls of mental health protective orders.

When hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005 most residents evacuated safely. But thousands lost homes, careers, and the lives they had known. Since then, many seem to have recovered emotionally from the trauma. But some have not.

Elizabeth Mahoney, St. Bernard resident and peer counselor.
Brett Anderson

The devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed is most visible in pictures of ruined houses and people’s destroyed possessions lying out on city streets. But there’s unseen damage that runs even deeper: the collective emotional trauma experienced by the thousands of people who lived through it.

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