levees

Coastal Desk
7:33 am
Tue December 16, 2014

Pentagon Announces Levee Armoring Contracts

The Pentagon says three Louisiana companies have contracts worth up to $200 million in total to armor levees in the New Orleans area.

The Pentagon says Bis Services of Kenner, Circle of Belle Chasse, and Shavers-Whittle Construction of Mandeville, were among 10 companies that bid over the Internet.

Their contracts are with the Army Corps of Engineers in New Orleans. They were on a list of contracts released last night by the Pentagon.

The work is to be done by December 2020. The amount paid for each job will be decided individually.

WRKF
3:12 am
Fri October 3, 2014

With SLFPA-E Nomination, Fate of Lawsuit and Levees Hangs in the Balance

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 10:12 am

The nominating committee for the South East Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East has made its selection to fill a slot on the levee board. They voted 7-3 a week ago to renominate Paul Kemp — a geologist in the Coastal Ecology Institute at LSU — who’s current term is expiring. 

The ball is back in Gov. Jindal’s court — he can accept or reject Kemp’s nomination or ask the state Senate to consider it — and the fate of the levee board’s lawsuit against oil and gas companies over damage to coastal wetlands hangs in the balance. 

Bob Marshall, reporter with The Lens in New Orleans, has been following all this.

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Latest News
7:21 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Debris Found In 17th Street Canal Levee

Workers pump cement slurry into the foundation of the 17th Street Canal in March 2011.
Credit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The US Army Corps of Engineers says there is no major threat from debris found inside the 17th Street Canal levee.

Corps critics aren’t so sure.

Chunks of concrete, bricks and glass were discovered during work to install sheet piling.

The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection District—East has been assured by the Corps that the material is being removed.

Sandy Rosenthal founded Levees.org after the catastrophic levee breaches following Hurricane Katrina nine years ago.

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Features
7:51 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On New Orleans' Sauvé's Crevasse Flood Of 1849

New Orleans was inundated by Mississippi River waters in the spring of 1849. This oil painting by Elizabeth Lamoisse shows Canal Street at the time of the flood. "Landscape" by Elizabeth Lamoisse, 1848 - 1849, from the Louisiana State Museum.
Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

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The Lens
12:35 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

New Orleans Flood Protection: Stronger Than Ever, Weaker Than Intended

The city's new $14.5 billion storm surge protection system is weaker than what Congress ordered it to be 50 years ago.
US Army Corps of Engineers Wikimedia

The 2014 hurricane season has started, and New Orleans metro area residents are living behind a new, $14.5 billion storm surge system acknowledged as the best they have ever had. 

But an investigation by The Lens shows this best-ever is still not as good as Congress originally ordered it to be.

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Le Show
12:00 pm
Sun February 2, 2014

Le Show For Feb. 2, 2014

Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry follows-up with John Barry about the Louisiana levees. He also brings more News of AfPAC, Karzai Talk, News of the Olympic Movement, and more!

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The Lens
7:29 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

For Strengthening Levees, Bermuda Grass Is Hard To Beat

Bermuda grass is considered ideal grass for armoring local levees because its dense root mass holds soils and it grows well in the local climate.
Bob Marshall The Lens

The idea that grass can armor anything is hard to believe.

But on a recent visit to the Lake Pontchartrain levee, LSU agronomist Jeff Beasley explained how plain old, garden variety grass has earned a reputation with the US Army Corps of Engineers as one of the best armoring materials to keep the huge mud walls of a levee from collapsing during a storm.

"You know how we reinforce concrete with rebar?" says Beasley. "We can do the same with these levees."

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Environment
6:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Levee Board Takes On Oil Industry Over Damage To Delta

New Orleans' levee board is suing energy companies for damaging the Mississippi River delta by cutting canals through the marshland. The canals let in sea water, which kills marshes, eroding the city's protective buffer against storms. A map of the delta.
Frank Relle

 

Eight years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has a new flood protection system — $14 billion of levees, pumps and flood gates built by the Army Corps of Engineers. Residents, though, don't think that will be enough. The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority - East, the local levee board, basically, says that as sea levels rise and wetlands down river get washed away, New Orleans will need more help.

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Flood Protection
10:57 am
Tue March 12, 2013

St. Charles West Bank Levee Gets Final Approval

The Army Corps of Engineers has approved the third and final phase of the St. Charles west bank hurricane levee, which means all three phases of the levee project have corps approval to move toward construction.

At the St. Charles Parish Council meeting on Monday night, Parish President V.J. St. Pierre said the Corps of Engineers approved a permit green-lighting the design and construction of Phase III Ellington, the last permit necessary to authorize the project. The other two phases had already been approved.

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The Lens
11:27 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Funding Crisis Looms For $14 Billion Hurricane Protection System

Credit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Metro area residents probably know stories about consumers with big eyes and small wallets who become “house poor.” But in the years ahead they may become familiar with a new, more frightening term: “levee poor.”

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