WWNO2 classical host Farrar Hudkins talks with Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra Music Director Carlos Miguel Prieto about this year's collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, a concert called "New Orleans and the Spanish World."

Catch the free concert at St. Louis Cathedral on Wed., Feb. 4 at 7:30 p.m., and streaming live on 89.9 WWNO and

Denny Culbert via John Sellards Design

Songwriters talk about a song being “honest.” And according to David Egan, that’s all about telling the truth about our battles and our triumphs — our loves and losses.

“We write music for grownup people,” he says. “Grownup music for grown-ass people.”

They’re the people you might see at the gas station, or in the grocery store. Or in the mirror.

Music Inside Out

At first, there wasn’t a name for the kind of music that Fats Domino played.

He called it rhythm and blues. But Domino’s songs stretched beyond that category.

In the late 1940s, Domino was working at a mattress factory in New Orleans and playing piano at night. He’d just gotten married… and both his waistline and fan base were expanding. That’s when the bandleader Billy Diamond first called him “Fats” — and predicted he’d have an outsized career.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

One of the questions people in the business community have been asking is, what's happens when the post-Katrina economic rejuvenation gets old? Are the next generation of innovators going to go someplace else?

Peter's guests on today's show answer that question with a resounding "no." They both head up new and growing businesses that have been born out of New Orleans' revolution in education.

Libby Fischer is CEO of Whetstone Education, a ground-breaking teacher evaluation system founded in New Orleans and spreading across the country.

This week on The Reading Life: We’ll be looking back at two local authors who achieved international acclaim in 2014.

We’ll hear from Joseph Boyden, whose novel, The Orenda, was the winner of the Canada Reads competition in March of 2014. We’ll also hear from Niyi Osundare, whom we interviewed in 2011 on the publication of his poems, City Without People: The Katrina Poems. Niyi Osundare received the National Order of Merit from his native Nigeria in 2014.

This month, as high school seniors apply for financial aid, we focus our Voices of Educators series on a college counselor.

Sheena Reed is Director of College Counseling at Sci Academy. She draws on her own experiences - as a first generation college student and college admissions officer — to guide her students.

Do you know a great teacher to include in our Voices of Educators series? Send us an email:

Support for Voices of Educators and education news on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

Fantail Media / Flickr

There’s a reason why lions prefer the company of other lions. Just ask Reggie Scanlan. As a bass player, Scanlan worked with James Booker and Professor Longhair before starting a 33-year run with the Radiators. He’s now in a band of all-stars called the New Orleans Suspects.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

Everybody knows right from wrong. Everybody knows numbers don't lie. Nobody wants to spend time in prison. Why, then, would a person lie about corporate profits, knowing there's a high probability they're going to get caught and end up behind bars?

Peter's guest on Out to Lunch wrote the book on business ethics, and it's not theoretical. Aaron Beam went to federal prison for his part in a multi-billion dollar fraud, and now teaches others how to make better decisions.

This week on The Reading Life: Miki Pfeffer, whose new book is Southern Ladies and Suffragists: Julia Ward Howe and Women’s Rights at the 1884 New Orleans World’s Fair.

And editor David Johnson talks about about 100 issues of great reading in Louisiana Cultural Vistas, the publication of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities.

Gregg Goldman

The day we visited Tom McDermott’s home, the sound of James Booker’s “Classified” greeted us. It was a sweet gesture: walking into a man’s home to the sound of your radio show’s theme music.

McDermott knows how to communicate with a piano.

Blame it on Rio… and ragtime. McDermott has a piano playing style that smacks of sweet melodies, savory harmonies, and spicy Brazilian rhythm. And he serves up all three this hour. Pull up a chair, and enjoy.