interviews

Eve Troeh / WWNO

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh visited Vietnam on assignment to report on the effects of climate change in a place with water challenges similar to New Orleans. She says it was an adventure unlike any she has recently experienced.

Treewoman8 / Flickr

The excesses of the carnival season are over. So this week, we’re playing sacred music with a foothold in Louisiana. Some songs are religious. Some aren’t. But they’re guaranteed to help get you ready for Easter, or Passover, or whatever day you’ve got circled on the calendar.

Mahalia Jackson, John Boutté, Branford Marsalis, Irma Thomas, Allen Toussaint, and Davell Crawford are in the mix. And so is the brass band that wants to know, “Whatcha gonna do for the rest of your life? Whatcha gonna do to make it right?”

StoryCorps, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to recording, preserving and sharing the stories of Americans from all backgrounds and beliefs, will record interviews in New Orleans from March 12 to April 8 as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour.

This week on the Reading Life:  New Orleans native, novelist T. Geronimo Johnson, author of Welcome to Braggsville, and poets Brett Evans and Chris Shipman, authors of Tit Rex Parade.

February is a big month for public school families. Applications to most of the city's schools are due on Feb. 27.

The New Orleans Parents' Guide is a key resource for families. It offers detailed information about every public school in the city.

Aesha Rasheed and Audrey Stewart produce the guide each year. They recently talked about the guide and application process with WWNO Education Reporter Mallory Falk.

It's New Orleans

    

There's an old saying about how to be successful in business —- "Build a better mousetrap." Meaning, find a product everybody wants and do it better. Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today have come up with new variations of products that enjoy massive worldwide popularity. Soft drinks and coffee.

Geoffrey Meeker has a little yellow truck you might have seen around town delivering his French Truck Coffee.

And Roy Nelson has a truck that he drives around town delivering his Fest Cola.

Intermusica

WWNO2 classical host Farrar Hudkins talks with Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra Music Director Carlos Miguel Prieto about this year's collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, a concert called "New Orleans and the Spanish World."

Catch the free concert at St. Louis Cathedral on Wed., Feb. 4 at 7:30 p.m., and streaming live on 89.9 WWNO and WWNO.org.

Denny Culbert via John Sellards Design

Songwriters talk about a song being “honest.” And according to David Egan, that’s all about telling the truth about our battles and our triumphs — our loves and losses.

“We write music for grownup people,” he says. “Grownup music for grown-ass people.”

They’re the people you might see at the gas station, or in the grocery store. Or in the mirror.

Music Inside Out

At first, there wasn’t a name for the kind of music that Fats Domino played.

He called it rhythm and blues. But Domino’s songs stretched beyond that category.

In the late 1940s, Domino was working at a mattress factory in New Orleans and playing piano at night. He’d just gotten married… and both his waistline and fan base were expanding. That’s when the bandleader Billy Diamond first called him “Fats” — and predicted he’d have an outsized career.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

One of the questions people in the business community have been asking is, what's happens when the post-Katrina economic rejuvenation gets old? Are the next generation of innovators going to go someplace else?

Peter's guests on today's show answer that question with a resounding "no." They both head up new and growing businesses that have been born out of New Orleans' revolution in education.

Libby Fischer is CEO of Whetstone Education, a ground-breaking teacher evaluation system founded in New Orleans and spreading across the country.

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