Hurricane Katrina

Find stories from WWNO, NPR and our partner stations as we explore New Orleans and the Gulf South 10 years after Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

A New Orleans police officer will serve 20 months in prison for lying about his actions after fatally shooting a man during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The victim was among thousands stranded after the 2005 storm.

Five former New Orleans police officers will serve from six to 65 years in prison for their parts in a notorious shooting after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Two unarmed civilians were killed and four others injured.

The St. Bernard Project is announcing a $100,000 grant from Toyota to continue building and rebuilding homes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. The non-profit is even more grateful for training it received from the car manufacturer.

A state advisory panel has voted against an effort led by the grassroots group Levees.org to mark two spots where levees breached during Hurricane Katrina. However, the drive continues, despite the opposition.

Tens of thousands of Gulf Coast residents may be getting relief from debt they thought they owed the federal government. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is sorting through rules Congress recently approved.

FEMA sent out 83,000 letters this year to victims of Hurricane Katrina and other 2005 storms. They were told they may have gotten too much federal money. FEMA says it may have made the wrong calculations, but the law requires it try to recoup the funds it paid by mistake.

Thousands of homeowners in southern states will be reviewing a proposed settlement with the major manufacturer involved in defective Chinese drywall litigation. The deal would pay for repairs and possibly medical expenses if the product made people sick.

The deal involves 4,500 property owners and Knauf Plasterboard. The company will pay for repairs and medical losses. Drywall imported from China from 2004 to 2007 eased demand from the housing boom and hurricane repairs.

A New Orleans police officer has been convicted of lying about a deadly shooting in the chaotic days after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The the officer's partner has been acquitted.

The city of New Orleans is giving notice to residents living in FEMA trailers that it's time to move. Eileen Fleming reports the city wants the trailers issued after Hurricane Katrina five years ago to be removed.

Award-winning playwright Eve Ensler directs "Swimming Upstream," marking the 5th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and paying tribute to the women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. One performance only, Mahalia Jackson Theater, 8 p.m., September 10th.

Times-Picayune culinary sleuths Marcelle Bienvenu and Judy Walker are helping local foodies rebuild post-Katrina — one recipe at a time. They stopped by the WWNO studios to talk to our Diane Mack about their latest project: Cooking Up a Storm.

Recipes from Cooking Up A Storm, reprinted with permission from editors Marcelle Bienvenu and Judy Walker

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