housing

George Bonnett / WWNO

Habitat for Humanity builds houses on the Northshore. This month, their construction crews look a bit different than usual.

Iberville Demolition Marks End Of An Era

Jul 28, 2013
Infrogmation / Wikipedia

The city is nearing final demolition of the Iberville Housing development, near the French Quarter. The collection of brick buildings has a storied history, and some structures will remain standing, as a nod to that history.

HANO

This week, The Lens, New Orleans’ investigative newsroom, has the latest on developments at HANO, the Housing Authority of New Orleans. The state-chartered agency runs publicly subsidized housing in the city, and serves up to 17,000 New Orleans families. It has been under control of the federal department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD, for abut 17 years.

Scott Threlkeld / The Advocate

The Housing Authority of New Orleans received a Federal grant last year to redevelop the Iberville Housing Development, the city’s last traditional public housing complex, on the edge of the French Quarter. The plan was to keep about a third of the buildings, demolish the rest, and build new, mixed-income housing.

Project Home Again

A nonprofit group that built 101 homes in Gentilly after Hurricane Katrina is launching another drive. Project Home Again will build another 100 energy-efficient houses.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is giving $1 million to a nonprofit that helps homeless veterans in northeast Louisiana.

The funds will go to the Wellspring Alliance for Families Inc., a group based in Monroe that provides housing for homeless veterans.

U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., says the money comes from a VA program that seeks to help veterans who are in the most need of aid — such as women with children, those from American-Indian tribes and those with drug addiction and mental health problems.

A new study shows there's a diminishing amount of blight in New Orleans. But the overall level is stubbornly high.

Population studies show that New Orleans, more than many American cities, needs to plan for housing Baby Boomers as they get older. A new study warns that blight could worsen as properties become abandoned.

The Wall Street Journal is calling it without any couching. The headline:

'The U.S. Housing Bust Is Over'

The lede:

"The housing market has turned—at last.

"The U.S. finally has moved beyond attention-grabbing predictions from housing 'experts' that housing is bottoming. The numbers are now convincing.

A new development of affordable housing in Central City, a neighborhood plagued by blight and abandoned houses, is seeing a flourishing of solar panels.

The Times-Picayune reports that residents in the Harmony Neighborhood Development are putting solar panels on their homes.

The development, being built by a nonprofit, is being constructed using federal funding to convert blighted and vacant properties into the new affordable housing.

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