Eve Abrams

Grace House provides gender specific treatment to women who have become dependent on alcohol or drugs so that they may lead sober and productive lives.

When Hurricane Katrina burst through the levees in New Orleans 10 years ago, floodwaters instantly rendered thousands of homes uninhabitable.

At the peak of the housing crisis that followed, nearly 12,000 New Orleans residents were homeless. They lived on the streets and in ruined buildings.

Abbott Roland was one of them. After the storm, he was rescued by helicopter from his porch, slept in the Superdome with other flood victims and then moved for a time to Chattanooga, Tennessee.

In 2009, then-Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki declared that all homeless veterans would have housing by year's end. New Orleans has made huge strides towards ending veteran homelessness in the city. (This story first aired on August 4, 2015 on All Things Considered.)

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Churches of several denominations are coming together to address an often invisible problem on the Northshore: family homelessness.

Nineteen churches decided to pool their resources and host homeless families in need. They take turns hosting the families at each church and rotate every week, providing food, childcare, counseling services and transportation, to help the family get back on their feet.

Well, technically it’s 13 for now, there’s a baby on the way.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Homelessness is a big issue in the New Orleans region, one that extends to the Northshore. Winter is particularly hard — shelters fill up, it is cold, and there is often nowhere to go. It can be especially hard for single men, and one organization is Slidell is trying to help.

Mark McVille has been homeless for two years. He has worked as a tugboat captain and construction worker, and was in the army for a while. He always had a pretty good job and had no problem supporting his kids.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores homelessness in New Orleans. Where did you sleep last night?

Last June, First Lady Michelle Obama announced an initiative to end veteran homelessness by the end of 2015. 

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu says the city has completed a pledge to house its homeless veterans. He says it’s the first major city to reach the goal set by First Lady Michelle Obama.

These bitter low temperatures are sticking around.

The National Weather Service says the frosty weather will continue through Wednesday. It’s blaming the combination of low temperatures and high winds.

It has prompted New Orleans officials and homeless advocates to take precautions for people living on the streets.

The New Orleans Advocate reports all four homeless shelters in the city were opened free of charge and allowed to expand their capacity to take on additional clients.

Bart Everson / Flickr

Inhabitants of a tent city at Calliope and Camp streets have been given a 72-hour notice to remove all tents and furniture from the area, The Advocate is reporting.

The action comes one week after the New Orleans City Council passed new rules strengthening the city’s ability to disperse homeless encampments.

The notifications were posted at about 8 p.m. Wednesday night, according to people living in the camp.

New Orleans Mission

The New Orleans Mission has passed the half-way mark in a fund drive to revamp its Central City home. The plan will ultimately have men needing accommodation lining up in the back of the building — not on Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard.