homelessness

Host Poppy Tooker with NPR's Kitchen Sisters Davia Nelson, left, and Nikki Silva, right.
Joe Shriner

On this week's show, we take a journey in sound with two radio luminaries, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as The Kitchen Sisters.

Davia and Nikki visit our kitchen at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum to discuss their amazing trajectory on NPR as well as how they came to uncover Hidden Kitchens, their duPont-Columbia Award-winning series.

Mission outreach coordinator Daniel Watts hands out snacks for homeless still living under the Pontchartrain Expressway recently cleared to make way for more downtown parking.
Eileen Fleming / WWNO

  

As New Orleans makes way for more downtown parking, police and health workers conducted another sweep under the Pontchartrain Expressway in March of homeless people living in makeshift encampments of tents and bedding.  Eileen Fleming has this report on where they went, how they’re adapting and what the city is planning.

Waiting for traffic court at the New Orleans Mission.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Our ongoing series Unprisoned has been bringing you stories of how mass incarceration affects New Orleans.

Last time, we learned about New Orleans Municipal Court, the largest criminal court in Louisiana. Today, we follow Municipal Court to the New Orleans Mission — where a large number of homeless people who are facing municipal charges are being served directly.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Homelessness is a big issue in the New Orleans region, one that extends to the Northshore. Winter is particularly hard — shelters fill up, it is cold, and there is often nowhere to go. It can be especially hard for single men, and one organization is Slidell is trying to help.

Mark McVille has been homeless for two years. He has worked as a tugboat captain and construction worker, and was in the army for a while. He always had a pretty good job and had no problem supporting his kids.

New Orleans Homelessness Issues Garner Attention

Dec 11, 2015

Since New Orleans' was announced as the winner of President Obama's challenge to house all homeless veterans last year, the city has seen a rise in interest on homelessness issues across the board.

Eve Abrams

Grace House provides gender specific treatment to women who have become dependent on alcohol or drugs so that they may lead sober and productive lives.

When Hurricane Katrina burst through the levees in New Orleans 10 years ago, floodwaters instantly rendered thousands of homes uninhabitable.

At the peak of the housing crisis that followed, nearly 12,000 New Orleans residents were homeless. They lived on the streets and in ruined buildings.

Abbott Roland was one of them. After the storm, he was rescued by helicopter from his porch, slept in the Superdome with other flood victims and then moved for a time to Chattanooga, Tennessee.

In 2009, then-Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki declared that all homeless veterans would have housing by year's end. New Orleans has made huge strides towards ending veteran homelessness in the city. (This story first aired on August 4, 2015 on All Things Considered.)

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Churches of several denominations are coming together to address an often invisible problem on the Northshore: family homelessness.

Nineteen churches decided to pool their resources and host homeless families in need. They take turns hosting the families at each church and rotate every week, providing food, childcare, counseling services and transportation, to help the family get back on their feet.

Well, technically it’s 13 for now, there’s a baby on the way.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores homelessness in New Orleans. Where did you sleep last night?

Last June, First Lady Michelle Obama announced an initiative to end veteran homelessness by the end of 2015. 

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