History

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

March is Women's History Month in the United States and the United Kingdom. To honor the month-long event, this week on Louisiana Eats! we'll speak with some of our favorite ladies in the Louisiana food scene.

Julia Reed joins us for a reflection on her life in the Mississippi Delta and why New Orleans is so dear to her heart. We'll also speak with the co-founder of the Red Stick Market in Baton Rouge and hear how Linda Green helped unit a Korean soup with a New Orleans cultural celebration.

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Today we start a new series with New Orleans geographer Richard Campanella. The Tulane professor and author of Bienville’s Dilemma and Geographies of New Orleans, among other titles, also recently started a column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune. His “Cityscapes” pieces explore New Orleans’ urban landscape and history each month.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As 2013 comes to a close, we’re looking back at some memorable moments. Eileen Fleming shares a visit she made to Dallas for a milestone historic memorial.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

210 years ago today, Governor William C.C. Claiborne issued this document to the people of New Orleans, announcing the United States' purchase of the Louisiana Territory two months earlier.

The proclamation — in three languages — explains the transition from Spain to France to the United States, and clarifies for the people of the city their new rights, and their responsibilities, as newly-minted Americans.

(h/t @wrightbryan3)

The Historic New Orleans Collection

New Orleans, the largest and most prosperous city in the antebellum Deep South, spent the Civil War in fetters, occupied by Union troops in late April 1862.

The Historic New Orleans Collection's latest exhibit, "Occupy New Orleans! Voices from the Civil War", taps the experiences of ordinary men and women — Northerners and Southerners alike — during that time. WWNO's Paul Maassen talked with Mark Cave, The Historic New Orleans Collection's Senior Curator and Oral Historian, and asked him about this unique exhibit.

Islands are not just about vacation paradise and escape. As commentator Gary Joiner points out, their discovery and sometimes mere existence have deep historical significance.


Copyright 2013 KDAQ-FM. To see more, visit http://www.redriverradio.org/.

The El Camino Real: From its starting point in Louisiana, this royal road spans the broad expanse of Texas. Commentator Gary Joiner explores its history.


Copyright 2013 KDAQ-FM. To see more, visit http://www.redriverradio.org/.

Commentator Gary Joiner recounts the remarkable life of a Civil War soldier in Louisiana who kept her gender a secret to the end.


Copyright 2013 KDAQ-FM. To see more, visit http://www.redriverradio.org/.

africandiasporaphd.com

In 2004, the Historic New Orleans Collection acquired a remarkable document written by Marc-Antoine Caillot a 21-year-old French adventurer who came to New Orleans almost 300 years ago. This travelogue, one of the most significant finds of its kind, has been translated into English and is now in print as a book.

On Notes from New Orleans Sharon Litwin talks to historian Erin Greenwald about this amazing and amusing documentation of life in French Colonial New Orleans.

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Sixty eight years ago this week — May 8, 1945 to be exact — the Second World War ended in Europe with the signing of the official documents in Berlin. But, for one group of British military women, it would be more than 30 years before they were allowed to talk about their secret role in that devastating conflict.

Sharon Litwin had the chance to speak with one of them for this week's Notes from New Orleans; she filed this report from the back patio of a charming, soft-spoken resident of Covington, Louisiana.

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