History

Elizabeth Miller

Jazz historian John McCusker captures moments, whether it's through his photography, his writing, or his storytelling. As the creator and guide of the Cradle of Jazz Tour, John takes people on New Orleans tours that link together specific locations with the vanguards, players, keepers, and lovers of jazz music. John joined NolaVie's Kelley Crawford in the studio to share some legends from the Jazz Age.  

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

Pat Denton Collection / Newcomb Archives, Tulane University

This is the first in a two-part series on the local Second-wave feminist movement and the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part II here. 

It’s July 3rd, 1982. Feminists are marching through downtown New Orleans in support of the Equal Rights Amendment, the ERA.

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

This is another edition of TriPod Xtras. We’ve cut together some highlights from a really interesting panel we went to a little while back, put on by the Broadmoor Improvement Association and held at Propeller. This event was right up our alley, because it was like a mashup of oral history and community engagement, and gave space for elders to share their experiences alongside folks that are doing work today.

Sandra Green Thomas

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history, and an attempt at reconciliation. Listen to Part I here

We left off at the Sold South Panel that took place in New Orleans in December of 2016. The discussion centered around something Georgetown University did in 1838 when the institution sold 272 enslaved people to two plantations in Louisiana to avoid bankruptcy.

Immigration buildings at what was 'Camp Algiers' circa 1916.
THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION, GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. PETER BERNARD, ACC. NO. 1984.112.228 / HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

Tripod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part II of its series on Camp Algiers, an internment camp that detained Latin Americans during World War II. Listen to Part I here.

Quarantine Station in Algiers La.
The Historic New Orleans Collection, acc. no. 1995.19 / Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part I of a two-part series about a World War II era internment camp in Algiers that held those suspicious of affiliations with axis powers. Listen to Part II here

The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mrs. Joy Segura, acc. no. 2004.0096.68

This is to a special edition of TriPod New Orleans @300. Producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson handed the mic over to the New Orleans Scholars, a group of students from Metairie Park Country Day and Benjamin Franklin High Schools. Each semester they collaborate with a community group to explore a local challenge: economic, environmental, political and historical.

Richard Campanella

Each month Richard Campanella explores a different story of New Orleans' geography and architecture, with  WWNO News Director Eve Troeh.

After the sleek lines, steel and glass of Modern architecture was embraced by New Orleans in various forms from the 1920s to the early 1970s, it was firmly rejected as the century closed. Campanella chalks this up to sentiment about the city's economy, and its outlook for the future.

Photograph of Mother Catherine and her congregation at the Temple of the Innocent Blood, ca. 1929.
Historic New Orleans Collection, made possible by the Clarisse Claiborne Grima Fund.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a portrait of Mother Catherine Seals, one of the city’s most prominent 20th century spiritual church leaders.

Mother Catherine Seals is a mysterious figure. There’s not much written about her, and there are only a few photographs of her. So a lot of what we do know about this spiritual mother is hearsay.

Jennifer Waxman / The National WWII Museum

Some say history belongs to the victors, but at the National World War II Museum, historical objects belong to the archivists. Jennifer Waxman is an archivist who handles much of the Museum’s rare artifacts, from handwritten letters to combat tanks. Jennifer spoke with NolaVie’s Brian Friedman about the life of an archivist and the places that life takes her.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

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