History

Imaginative view of Madame Delphine's House, 253 Royal Street in the Vieux Carre.
Kemble, Edward Windsor / Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a story about George Washington Cable, and the beautiful danger of writing New Orleans-based historical fiction.


John Menzser

The latest edition of NOLA Life Stories takes place at a department store in Gretna, 1937. This is a time when families lived above the store, when advertisements were delivered door to door, and babies got their first pair of shoes for free.

This was also a time of separate but equal, of back-of-the-bus politics. But not every nook and cranny of the city was gripped by segregation. As Sam and John Menszer remember, the customers at their family’s shop kept any racist attitudes– and their bags – at the door.  

 A Tobacco Card from 1887
Joseph Makkos / NOLA DNA

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a profile of Eliza Jane Nicholson, a small town poet who became the first woman publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper.


Image courtesy Library of Congress, Richard Campanella

Richard Campanella, Professor of Geography at Tulane School of Architecture and author of the monthly Cityscapes column at Nola.com, sits down with News Director Eve Troeh for their monthly interview.

This month Campanella talks about how and why New Orleans was divided into three municipalities in the 1830s due to cultural differences of its many populations.


In 1834, artist George Catlin witnessed Choctaw lacrosse in Indian Territory near present-day Oklahoma.
George Catlin / Smithsonian American Art Museum

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new story about an indigenous sport that became popular before the Civil War.


The Purple Knights pose on the court; Harold Sylvester is kneeling next to his coach.
Harold Sylvester / Amistad Research Center

TriPod -- New Orleans at 300 revisits the first integrated high school sports contest in Louisiana, on February 25, 1965.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod goes back to the days when Algiers was a stomping ground for bullfights and other forms of animal combat.

It’s a Sunday afternoon. The sun is out, you’ve already gone to church, and you’re not sure what to do next. Then you find out the ferry to cross the river to Algiers is running at half rate, on account of a sporting event. A fight. Between a bull. And a grizzly bear.

Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

 1918 photo of Louis Mayer's father (Louis E. Mayer), and uncles Gus (Gustave John Mayer) and Rudolph Mayer on the stage at the Turnverein von New Orleans. Uncle Gus is top left, Louis Mayer is in the middle.
Louis Mayer

When you think about gymnastics — parallel bars, the pommel horse, ropes — what else pops into your head? Fighting Napoleon and frosted beer mugs? Me too!

Here's how the Germans brought gymnastics to New Orleans.

Continuum this week presents a program called The Cries of London, referring to the short lyrical and musical calls of merchants hawking their products and services at the beginning of the 17th century. Many street cries were incorporated into larger musical works, preserving them from oblivion.

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