Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month WWNO talks to Tulane School of Architecture Professor of Geography Richard Campanella about his "Cityscapes" column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. He's been chronologically exploring the architectural styles that have swept the city. In the early 1900s New Orleans - like much of the nation - turned its eye toward California.

A 1972 Times-Picayune article detailing the discovery of coffins buried in the French Quarter.
University of New Orleans

October is Louisiana Archeology month! And this week’s TriPod New Orleans at 300 digs into the discovery, and rediscovery, of New Orleans’ first cemetery.

When you walk around the French Quarter, you see all kinds of tours going by- intimate horse drawn carriage tours, ghost tours, architectural tours. But most tours don’t touch one of the neighborhood’s most significant landmarks. Probably because you can’t see it.

Agostino Brunias / ArtDaily.org

There is a common myth told about 19th-century New Orleans. It goes something like this: Imagine you’re in an elegant dance hall in New Orleans in the early 1800s. Looking around, you see a large group of white men and free women of color, who were at the time called quadroons, meaning they supposedly had ¼ African ancestry. The mothers play matchmakers, and introduce their daughters to these white men, who then ask their hand in a dance.

Tripod New Orleans @300 revisits the UpStairs Lounge Fire in the wake of last month’s Orlando Pulse Night Club shooting.

In 1973, Clayton Delery-Edwards was living just outside New Orleans in Metairie, going to high school and- as he puts it - wrestling with "the G question."

“You know by that point I figured out what it was, and I still wasn't sure how it was done, but I knew what it was.”

Clayton’s talking about being gay.

The Riot in New Orleans... the Struggle for the Flag. 900 block Canal Street.
The Collins C. Diboll Vieux Carre Digital Survey at The Historic New Orleans Collection at The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to remember the 1866 massacre at the city’s Mechanics' Institute. It’s part of a series of episodes on the Reconstruction era.

On the grounds of Whitney Plantation. Former slave quarters are on the right with Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall visible in the background.
Sarah Holtz

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate the 151st anniversary of Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

The Provost Guard in New Orleans taking up Vagrant Negroes. (1974.25.9.190)
The Historic New Orleans Collection

It was June. It was hot. Kids were out of school, keeping busy outdoors. Parents were inside. Kind of like how it is now, except it was 146 years ago.

Molly Mitchell

  TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two in a series on links between history and tourism.

Historic New Orleans Collection; Gift of Michael Adler [2008.0038.15]

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with a two-part series on tourism, starting with the city’s relationship to the industry, and how we became dependent on it.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month we hear from Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. This time, WWNO’s Eve Troeh talks to him about how New Orleans started “going Greek” in architecture, with the Greek Revival movement hitting the city in the early 1800s.