History

On the grounds of Whitney Plantation. Former slave quarters are on the right with Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall visible in the background.
Sarah Holtz

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate the 151st anniversary of Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

The Provost Guard in New Orleans taking up Vagrant Negroes. (1974.25.9.190)
The Historic New Orleans Collection

It was June. It was hot. Kids were out of school, keeping busy outdoors. Parents were inside. Kind of like how it is now, except it was 146 years ago.

Molly Mitchell

  TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two in a series on links between history and tourism.

Historic New Orleans Collection; Gift of Michael Adler [2008.0038.15]

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with a two-part series on tourism, starting with the city’s relationship to the industry, and how we became dependent on it.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month we hear from Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. This time, WWNO’s Eve Troeh talks to him about how New Orleans started “going Greek” in architecture, with the Greek Revival movement hitting the city in the early 1800s.

Photo by Owen F. Murphy, Jr., The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Arts Council of New Orleans [1996.93.47]

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its highway series. This is the story of the I-10 interstate bridge that sits above Claiborne Avenue.

Part one of this story was about the proposed Riverfront Expressway through the French Quarter and along the Mississippi River. That leg of the highway did not happen, and the French Quarter was saved from being demolished under a freeway. But that same year, 1968, a different section of the Riverfront Expressway did go up. Under that part? The Treme neighborhood, along Claiborne Avenue.

Historic New Orleans Collection

Call them whatever you want: hipsters or hippies, beatniks or punks, New Orleans has always been an attractive place for American bohemianism. But despite its laid back attitude, the people down here often think these subcultures threaten the way things are done. Amzie Adams encountered that kind of opposition when he moved here in the late 60’s, but then quickly found a way to participate in New Orleans’ culture. 

The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mr. David D. Plater [2003.0083.2.1]

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a two-part series on highways. The first looks at a controversy so intense, it’s called the ‘Second Battle of New Orleans.’

Imaginative view of Madame Delphine's House, 253 Royal Street in the Vieux Carre.
Kemble, Edward Windsor / Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a story about George Washington Cable, and the beautiful danger of writing New Orleans-based historical fiction.


John Menzser

The latest edition of NOLA Life Stories takes place at a department store in Gretna, 1937. This is a time when families lived above the store, when advertisements were delivered door to door, and babies got their first pair of shoes for free.

This was also a time of separate but equal, of back-of-the-bus politics. But not every nook and cranny of the city was gripped by segregation. As Sam and John Menszer remember, the customers at their family’s shop kept any racist attitudes– and their bags – at the door.  

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