History

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment, where host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sits down with a special guest for a one on one conversation. This week, Laine spoke with Isabel Wilkerson, author of “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” while she was in town to give a talk at TEDWomen. This historical work studies the movement of African Americans who left the south for the North, Midwest, and Western parts of the United States, between 1915 and 1970.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

New Orleans has a great new tool for music lovers. A Closer Walk is an interactive, location-based website about New Orleans music history. Just tap the map and you can find songs, rare photos, stories by local writers, and much more. One of the project’s founders, author Randy Fertel, speaks with NolaVie’s Renée Peck to share more about A Closer Walk.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Renée Peck.

Wynne Muscatine Graham

WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 launches its third season with this special on the relationship between New Orleans and Haiti. Listen to the hour long documentary here:

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with an hour-long special that explores two places linked in history. called “Haiti and New Orleans: Is the Feeling Mutual?”

Tune in Friday October 27 at 1pm  or Wednesday November 1 at 7pm

Once there was a slave uprising so epic, it led Napoleon to sell Louisiana to the United States, and brought thousands of refugees to New Orleans, doubling the city's population in just a few months.  The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), the only successful slave rebellion in the Americas, had a dramatic and lasting effect on New Orleans and North America.  Today many New Orleanians, black and white, trace their ancestral roots to Haiti.  The Caribbean nation remains an important part of the story New Orleans tell about itself.  But is New Orleans a part of Haitian history?  Is the feeling mutual?  TriPod sent producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson to find out.

Wynne Muscatine Graham / WWNO

WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns next week. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson traveled to Haiti this past summer and will launch the third season on Oct. 27, with an hour-long special about the relationship between Haiti and New Orleans. This documentary is called, "Haiti And New Orleans: Is The Feeling Mutual?" WWNO's Janae Pierre sat down with Laine to get a sneak peek of this TriPod special.

The Mascot

In celebration of the city’s upcoming Tricentennial, NolaVie and New Orleans Historical bring you the series Who Did it Better? New Orleans Then and Now. In it, we look at offbeat aspects of the city’s history and their parallels in the present. Today we give you: Big Easy Bikes. Call it a story about recycling.

The Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies

New Orleans is a city of stories, stories that weave a collective tapestry of a rich and colorful past. Students in the history department at UNO have been spinning these threads into a collection of app-based tours called New Orleans Historical. NolaVie's Renee Peck speaks with historian Molly Mitchell to learn more.  

Storyville Exhibit Showcases Bygone Social Experiment

Aug 10, 2017
E. J. Bellocq / Neal Auction Company

The city’s infamous Red Light District, Storyville, weaves itself through the legends and lore of New Orleans history. It’s also the topic of a current exhibit at The Historic New Orleans Collection. The exhibit is called Storyville: Madams and Music. In this first part of a two-part series, NolaVie’s Brian Friedman speaks with Pamela Arceneaux, author of Guidebooks to Sin and one of the exhibit’s curators.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A third confederate monument in New Orleans was removed in the middle of the night. The statue of P.G.T. Beauregard that once stood at the entrance to New Orleans’ City Park is now gone.

It took almost 7 hours for workers to strap the statue of confederate general PGT Beauregard and his horse to a crane and lift it onto a flatbed truck. Karen Murray was there in protest. She wiped away angry tears as she watched workers set up in the dark.

Elizabeth Miller

Jazz historian John McCusker captures moments, whether it's through his photography, his writing, or his storytelling. As the creator and guide of the Cradle of Jazz Tour, John takes people on New Orleans tours that link together specific locations with the vanguards, players, keepers, and lovers of jazz music. John joined NolaVie's Kelley Crawford in the studio to share some legends from the Jazz Age.  

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

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