History

Community
3:20 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Cityscapes: When St. Bernard Made Cars

The 1922 Ford Assembly plant in Arabi, St. Bernard Parish
TheHenryFord.org

In this month's Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune, geographer Richard Campanella chooses another industrial subject. The Ford Motor Co. plant in Arabi, along the Mississippi River in St. Bernard Parish, employed hundreds of local workers, starting in the early 1920s.

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Nola Life Stories
5:00 am
Mon November 3, 2014

AP Turead Jr.'s Creole Perspective: Memories Of The 7th Ward

After graduating from Xavier University, Turead left New Orleans in 1960 and traveled the world before settling in White Plains, New York, where he worked as a director of special education for more than 30 years.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

AP Turead Jr. was raised in the 7th Ward, which he called “the stronghold of the Creole community.” A Creole himself and the son of prominent civil rights lawyer AP Turead Sr., he remembers the neighborhood upheld education and leadership. But as often as this unified message was preached, Turead says not everyone in the community was given equal footing. 

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Latest News
5:41 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Refurbished Tomb Of Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau To Be Unveiled On Halloween

Before getting a new look, the tomb of Marie Laveau in St Louis Cemetery No. 1 was a target for vandals.
Anthony Fine Flickr

The final resting place of New Orleans Voodoo queen Marie Laveau has been restored to its original state. The refinished tomb in Cemetery No. 1 will be unveiled this Friday, on Halloween.

According to NOLA.com, Bayou Preservation was hired in August by the Archdiocese of New Orleans and Save Our Cemeteries to return the monument to its 200-year-old original state. The restoration cost $10,000.

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

John Mecom Jr., Original Owner Of The Saints, Says Professional Football Is No Place For A Romantic

John Mecom Jr. was actively involved in the sports industry. Apart from the Saints he owned Mecom Racing Team, which managed several Formula One racing teams and drivers.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

When New Orleans was awarded its NFL franchise in 1966, the first person to own the team was John Mecom Jr. – a 26-year-old Houstonian whose father made a fortune in the oil industry. An avid sports fan, John helped shape the team’s identity: he picked out their colors and logos, and even helped move them to the Superdome.

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Community
7:39 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Cityscapes: A 1941 Pop-Up Factory On Polymnia Street

Higgins Industries
Courtesy World War II Museum

Every month, we hear from Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune.

This month Campanella explores Andrew Higgins' makeshift, pop-up factory to make a new kind of vessel for the Navy in 1941, in the 1600 block of Polymnia Street — then (as now) a residential area. In just two weeks, hundreds of workers produced and delivered 50 vessels, based on a prototype tested in Lake Pontchartrain.

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Nola Life Stories
5:00 am
Tue September 2, 2014

A First-Hand Account Of Integration: Leona Tate Looks Back At McDonogh 19

As a young child without reference, the crowds of protesters awaiting Leona Tate at McDonogh 19 in the Lower 9th Ward sounded like a boisterous Mardi Gras parade.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

When the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that separate black and white schools were unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education, it seemed desegregation was close at hand. But it took six years before the New Orleans school system was integrated. In the fall of 1960, Leona Tate — then only 6 years old — was one of four young black girls escorted through a crowd of protestors.

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Nola Life Stories
5:00 am
Mon August 18, 2014

Ain't Dere No More: Sydney Besthoff Reflects On K&B

Among the many innovations that K&B Drugstores brought to the New Orleans area were self-service drugstores, which didn't exist when Sydney Besthoff, left, began working at his family's company.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection & Infrogmation

When he started working at the family business in the late 1940’s, Sydney Besthoff III had no intention of becoming K&B Drugstore’s lead man. Over the course of the next 20 years, Sydney worked in every aspect of the business and became general manager. He expanded the company along the Gulf Coast throughout the 70’s and 80’s then sold the beloved chain in 1997. There was a local outcry — after all, K&B had been in New Orleans since 1905.

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Features
9:47 am
Fri August 8, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: Anniversary Of An Epidemic

Workers display rat-trapping equipment in New Orleans, circa 1914.
U.S. Public Health Service National Library of Medicine

At a time when the Ebola virus is causing panic throughout the world, and has prompted dire warnings from international public health officials, we're revisiting a plague of old: The Plague.

For this month's "Cityscapes" piece on Nola.com, Tulane University's Richard Campanella focused on one of New Orleans's own epidemics. This month marks the 100th anniversary of the bubonic plague outbreak in New Orleans.

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Latest News
8:11 am
Thu July 24, 2014

New Footage Of Sunken WWII Vessels In Gulf

A side-scan sonar image of the German U-boat U-166 in 2001, on the Gulf floor approximately 50 miles southeast of New Orleans.
Credit National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Scientists are getting a crystal-clear look at two historic vessels almost a mile deep in the Gulf of Mexico.

Pictures were taken from a pair of mini-subs tethered to explorer Robert Ballard’s vessel — the Nautilus.

They show small holes in a lifeboat that may have gone down with a passenger ship sunk in 1942 by a Nazi submarine. Or, it may have been scuttled after passengers and crew were rescued.

Interpretations differ.

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Latest News
7:24 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Town Of Jean Lafitte Honoring Its Namesake And Community

The Town of Jean Lafitte is unveiling an official state historical marker Saturday.

Local officials are proud of the community named after the smuggler who became a military hero in the war of 1812.

Say what you will about Jean Lafitte — smuggler, pirate, scoundrel — but his name still draws a crowd. There’s the bar in the French Quarter, and the Jefferson Parish town with his name.

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