health

Questions from his estate planning clients prompted attorney Paul Rabalais to investigate organ donation. Now Rabalais sponsors an annual 5K run/walk to support the Louisiana Organ Procurement Agency (LOPA). For more information about the 5K run/walk, go to www.lopa.org.


Trust for America's Health

A national study shows Louisiana is the most obese state in the country. Findings show the cause is more complicated than simply blaming the rich cooking.

Louisiana is tied for the fattest state in the nation, with an adult obesity rate of almost 35 percent. Mississippi falls behind by a fraction of a percentage, and Arkansas is very close behind. (Arkansas was the only state this year where obesity had a statistical increase.)

Dr. Robert Emmons of the Ochsner Blood Cancers and Stem Cell Transplant Program says it's an exciting time for blood cancer treatment, with many new drugs and sources for stem cells.


At the close of the recent legislative session, Gov. Bobby Jindal vetoed additional funding to pay for services for the developmentally disabled.

Two weeks ago, an effort to override the veto failed.

The $3.9 million would have covered a partial year of comprehensive at-home disability services for an additional 200 people through what are called "New Opportunity Waivers".

First Lady Michelle Obama brought her signature message about reducing childhood obesity to New Orleans. The First Lady also mentioned immigration and health care matters occupying her husband’s agenda.

Willis-Knighton Health System is building a $40 million Proton Therapy Center that will offer a high-tech, state-of-the-art radiation treatment for cancer. The 55,000 square-foot expansion of its cancer center is expected to create about 15 new jobs. There are 11 such proton beam centers nationwide. Dr. Lane Rosen, Willis-Knighton’s director of radiation oncology, said during a press briefing yesterday that Willis-Knighton will offer the first compact proton therapy system.

A mobile medical clinic is steadily gaining traction in rural and urban areas of northwest Louisiana after receiving its nonprofit status and serving 1,400 people last year. St. Luke’s Episcopal Mobile Medical Ministry is an RV set up just like a doctor’s office. Its volunteers regularly visit 10 communities and provide primary care and health screenings.

Lois Maberry, board chairman of the medical ministry that began in 2007, said the drop-in clinic is truly open to all.

The American Cancer Society aims to recruit 500 people from the Ark-La-Tex to participate in the third generation of a cancer prevention study that first began in the 1960s. The organization has partnered with the YMCA in Shreveport and two other organizations to host sign-up events for the study. It involves taking an initial waist measurement and drawing a small blood sample. 

Environmental remediation scientists at LSU’s School of the Coast and Environment have found remnants of crude oil in the hearts of pogy that live off Grand Isle.

Pogy, a baitfish more officially called menhaden, make up the second largest commercial catch in the United States. They’re not only resold as baitfish, but they’re also processed into fish oil and fish meal, making their way into vitamins, cosmetics and livestock feeds.

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