grocery stores

Kate Richardson / WWNO

A new Whole Foods store opened in Mid-City on Tuesday, at Broad and Bienville. It’s the site of the former Schwegmann’s grocery, which has been vacant ever since Katrina.

The space includes four nonprofit tenants in addition to the Whole Foods. The upscale grocery is just one of many factors reshaping the area.

Ten days before the grand opening of the new Whole Foods, the meeting room at the Sojourner Truth community center was buzzing in anticipation.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

More than eight years after it flooded and closed due to Hurricane Katrina, the Circle Food Store on the corner of Claiborne and St. Bernard Avenues is about to reopen its doors. The historic landmark served the 7th Ward from 1938 up until the storm, and it’s said to have been the first New Orleans grocery owned and operated by African-Americans. Long time residents and customers voice their reactions to the long-awaited return of this neighborhood staple.

Eve Troeh

One week ago a new Winn-Dixie supermarket opened its doors on Carrollton Avenue, and many people in the neighborhood say that launched a full on grocery war.

Because Rouses Market has a store right across the street.

Giveaways, food samples, contests and entertainment have been the weapons so far. South Louisiana-based Rouses has done a fair share of trash talking about the Florida-based chain Winn-Dixie, to boot.

Supermarkets have spent decades catering to the needs and wants of baby boomers, and now the millennial generation is disappointed with what they're finding at traditional grocery stores, and are shopping elsewhere in greater numbers.

In fact, a new market research report called Trouble in Aisle 5 reports that millennials buy only 41 percent of their food at traditional grocery stores, compared to the boomers' 50 percent.