film

Switch, a new documentary bringing awareness to our energy challenges, is making its New Orleans debut at Loyola University's Nunemaker Hall on October 18 at 7 p.m. Producer Thomas Walsh caught up with Harry Lynch, the film's director, and filed this review.

A new documentary is being screened at the Zeitgeist Multidisciplinary Arts Center called Beauty is Embarrassing. The movie is about artist Wayne White, an artist who's recently found success as a contemporary painter. White recently spoke about his journey from his rural homeland to the fine art galleries of Los Angeles.

Toronto Looks East With Asian Film Summit

Sep 17, 2012

On Sunday, the annual Toronto International Film Festival came to a close after 11 days of screenings, meetings and, of course, parties. It's become an important place to kick off the fall film season. But this year, the festival wasn't only looking west to Hollywood — it was also sharpening its focus on the East, and the rise of new cinema from India, in particular.

One of the films at this year's Toronto festival was called Shanghai; it comes from Mumbai, and was directed by Dibakar Banerjee.

Amy Adams has played a Disney princess, a puckish Amelia Earhart, an innocent young nun and a blogging Brooklynite who wants to follow the recipe for being Julia Child.

But she takes a more steely turn in her latest role in The Master, which has just opened in New York and Los Angeles. The film, written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, also stars Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

In the new movie Arbitrage, actor Richard Gere plays a Wall Street tycoon who is intent on making money, no matter the fallout. Audie Cornish talks to Gere about the film.

Director Spike Lee is having an incredibly busy year. He's directing Mike Tyson's one-man show on Broadway, combing through the Michael Jackson archives to commemorate Bad, and he's just released a new feature film called Red Hook Summer.

Producer Thomas Walsh recently spoke with Spike Lee about the movie that's sure to get you talking.

Dreamworks' animated movie Puss in Boots was a big deal. It won an Oscar, and its swashbuckling, sloe-eyed kitty was voiced by Antonio Banderas.

The meticulous computer-generated animation took four years and something like $130 million to make. But another cartoon, Puss In Boots: A Furry Tail, was hand-drawn in six months for less than $1 million. It went straight to DVD — one of the many low-budget productions riding the coattails of Hollywood blockbusters.

Southeastern Louisiana University's Division of Extended Studies is offering a non-credit course on makeup for filmmaking.

Available for high school students and adults interested in the film industry, the course will be taught by Tara Bennett, a freelance makeup artist with experience in makeup for photography, film, and theatrical stage.

The course is scheduled on the university's main Hammond campus on Wednesdays from 6-8 p.m. from Sept. 12- Oct. 10. The cost is $125, which includes all materials needed, and one continuing education credit will be awarded.

Budget group: Film tax break program needs limits

Aug 8, 2012

A new report is suggesting state lawmakers should lessen Louisiana's generous film tax credits and cap the amount of money it can cost the state each year in lost revenue.

Louisiana spent $231 million last year to attract movie productions, through a tax break program that continues to grow larger annually and that has cost the state more than a billion dollars over a decade.

The left-leaning Louisiana Budget Project says the state hasn't gotten much in return besides the prestige of hosting big-name Hollywood actors.

This week on Inside the Arts, a piano competition heats up at Loyola University; there's much talk about a Louisiana-shot film that took top honors at the Sundance Film Festival; we'll tour an overlooked French Quarter institution; and we take a peek at an exhibit that's hitting a high note with jazz lovers.

Pages