Features

Features
9:00 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Discovery of Human Remains Delays Iberville Redevelopment

Charmaine Williams goes for a walk with her grandchildren and daughter in the Iberville public housing development. Archaeologists have confirmed that part of the housing complex sits on an old cemetery, likely once part of St. Louis No. 1.
Scott Threlkeld The Advocate

The Housing Authority of New Orleans received a Federal grant last year to redevelop the Iberville Housing Development, the city’s last traditional public housing complex, on the edge of the French Quarter. The plan was to keep about a third of the buildings, demolish the rest, and build new, mixed-income housing.

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Remembrances
4:25 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Bar Code Co-Inventor Was Always Experimenting

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 7:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

If one sound could define a man's career, Norman Joseph Woodland would be best described by this:

(SOUNDBITE OF BEEPING)

SIEGEL: That's the sound of a bar code scanner, and Woodland was the mind behind the lines. He co-invented the bar code. Woodland died Sunday at his home in Edgewater, New Jersey. He was 91.

SUSAN WOODLAND: From a very early age, my dad was really interested in how things worked.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

That's his daughter, Susan Woodland.

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Remembrances
11:00 am
Thu December 13, 2012

Remembering Ravi Shankar

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 1:08 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we want to take a moment to remember a legend in Indian classical music. Ravi Shankar died this week at the age of 92. He played the sitar, a long six-stringed wood instrument. He used it to communicate Indian music and culture to an American audience, and in fact audiences around the world. Shankar is known both for his own musicianship and his collaborations with Western greats like the Beatles and John Coltrane. Here's a collaboration with American violinist Yehudi Menuhin. The album is called "West Meets East."

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Remembrances
1:56 pm
Wed December 12, 2012

Sitar Player Remembers The Legendary Ravi Shankar

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 3:04 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

As you probably heard by now, the great sitar player Ravi Shankar died yesterday at the age of 92. His music arrived in most American ears thanks to George Harrison and the Beatles, whose interest triggered something of a sitar craze back in the late '60s. Harrison played the exotic instrument on a couple of tracks. The Rolling Stones followed suit on "Paint It Black." The electric sitar soon followed. But Ravi Shankar remained the unchallenged master. But what do I know? He's the only Indian-born sitar player I ever heard.

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The Record
12:00 am
Wed December 12, 2012

Ravi Shankar, Who Brought Eastern Music To Western Legends, Dies

Ravi Shankar circa 1960 in the U.K.
David Redfern Redferns

Originally published on Wed December 12, 2012 7:40 am

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Features
6:54 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

Grow Dat Youth Farm Nurtures Leaders

Grow Dat Youth Farm.
Dacia Idom

When teenagers look for a job, they often seek skills and training just as much as money. But for kids growing up without abundant resources, opportunities for developing confidence, humility, and a good work ethic can be hard to come by. Yet one New Orleans program, the Grow Dat Youth Farm, provides all of this and more in one fell swoop.

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Remembrances
10:56 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Remembering Jenni Rivera

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 3:08 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally, we want to take a few minutes today to remember Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera. She died in a plane crash in Mexico on Sunday, flying from a concert to a show taping. She was 43 years old, a mother and a grandmother, and a major star on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. Here's a bit of a popular song "La Gran Senora," where she tells her man's other woman to back off.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LA GRAN SENORA")

JENNI RIVERA: (Singing in Spanish)

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Remembrances
5:36 am
Tue December 11, 2012

Classical Music Scholar Charles Rosen Dies At 85

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 9:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Charles Rosen was a Renaissance man in an age of hyper-specialization: a pianist who could play Baroque and Romantic works, as well as modern pieces. He was also a National Book Award-winning author. When Charles Rosen died yesterday in New York City of cancer, he was 85 years old.

NPR's Anastasia Tsioulcas has this appreciation.

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The Record
4:26 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Remembering Banda Diva Jenni Rivera

Jenni Rivera performs at the Lilith Fair in 2010 in San Diego.
David Bergman Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 7:44 pm

To listen to Mandalit del Barco's appreciation of Jenni Rivera's life and career, as heard on All Things Considered, click the audio link.

Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera died Sunday in an airplane that crashed in the early hours of the morning in Toluca, west of Mexico's capital. The legendary musician, household name and feminist presence in the Latin music scene was 43.

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The Picture Show
12:35 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

A Black And White 1860s Fundraiser

Rosa, Charley and Rebecca are three of eight freed slaves who sat for portraits in 1863-1864 that were sold to raise money to fund schools for emancipated slaves in Louisiana. The three were chosen because it was believed their near-white complexions would draw more sympathy — and support — from a country torn apart by slavery and civil war.
Charles Paxson Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 4:05 pm

They look like any other 19th century vignettes and portraits of children kneeling in prayer or cloaked in the U.S. flag.

But these cartes de visite (a calling card with a portrait mounted on it that was all the rage during the 1860s) featured Charles, Rebecca and Rosa — former slave children who looked white.

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