features

Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Jeremy Davenport: A Man & His Horn

  • Jeremy Davenport — A Man & His Horn

When jazz trumpeter Jeremy Davenport got off the road to take a lengthy engagement at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in New Orleans, he said no one seemed more surprised than his former boss — Harry Connick Jr. Davenport had traveled the world in Connick's band, which was and remains, hot stuff.

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Music Reviews
11:14 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Harmony, Teenagers And 'The Complete Story Of Doo-Wop'

Vocal groups like The Ink Spots went on for decades, often without a single member of the original group appearing with them.
Fred Ramage Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:31 am

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Joe South, Of 'Games People Play' Fame, Dies

Joe South, in 2009.
Rick Diamond Getty Images
  • A clip of Joe South, singing 'Games People Play'
  • A clip from Deep Purple doing 'Hush'

Joe South, who wrote such '60s and '70s hits as Games People Play and (I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack at his home in Buford, Ga. He was 72.

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Latin America
9:34 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Guess Who's Chopping Down The Amazon Now?

Loggers discuss the day's plan in a camp called Puesto Viejo, or "old post."
Carlos Villalon for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:20 pm

Though Brazil's Amazon has been the focus of environmental groups for decades, the deforestation rate there has fallen dramatically in recent years as clear-cutting of Amazonian jungle in eight other countries has started to rise.

As a result, the 40 percent of Amazonia located in a moon-shaped arc of countries from Bolivia to Colombia to French Guiana faces a more serious threat than the jungle in Brazil. The culprits range from ranching to soybean farming, logging to infrastructure development projects.

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Around the Nation
2:24 am
Wed September 5, 2012

The Strange Story Of The Man Behind 'Strange Fruit'

Abel Meeropol watches as his sons, Robert and Michael, play with a train set.
Courtesy of Robert and Michael Meeropol

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 2:37 pm

One of Billie Holiday's most iconic songs is "Strange Fruit," a haunting protest against the inhumanity of racism. Many people know that the man who wrote the song was inspired by a photograph of a lynching. But they might not realize that he's also tied to another watershed moment in America's history.

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Hurricane Isaac
5:37 pm
Mon September 3, 2012

Photo Essay: After Isaac

Heavy winds from Hurricane Isaac brought roof damage to many New Orleans structures like Upperline, a popular restaurant in the Uptown neighborhood.
Erin Krall

Photographer Erin Krall captured a glimpse of a city slowly returning to normal in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac.

You can find more of Erin's work on her website, and regularly here on WWNO.org.

Features
10:00 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Photo Essay: Community Hub

Zoe Sullivan

Correspondent Zoe Sullivan brings us this snapshot of a Bywater mainstay — a barbershop that serves as a "community hub" for the neighborhood.

Says Zoe:

This is a photo essay that began in my mind when I lived in the Bywater and would bike by the door to this barber shop. Its obvious age and it’s position at an angle to the street intrigued me. A few weeks ago, I finally went to see if I could take some pictures. Michael Williamson gave me some wonderful suggestions on how to improve the work, and here is the result.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:06 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

We're With You Louisiana

We'll be back next week with an hour with Jeremy Davenport. Stay safe, everyone!  

2:33 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

With Isaac, change is in the air

Lead in text: 
How much safer is the Gulf Coast from a catastrophic storm like Hurricane Katrina, which slammed the region in 2005, precipitating New Orleans' levee failure and killing more than 1,800 people?
NEW ORLEANS - Levees are stronger, flood walls higher and residents and cities better prepared. But how much safer is the Gulf Coast from a catastrophic storm like Hurricane Katrina, which slammed the region in 2005, killing more than 1,800 people and drowning 80% of New Orleans?
The Two-Way
5:02 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

As Isaac Strengthens, Louisiana's Levees, Flood Gates Gird For Post-Katrina Test

A satellite view of Isaac churning in the Gulf of Mexico.
National Hurricane Center

The National Hurricane Center says that it expects Tropical Storm Isaac to continue strengthening up until it makes landfall.

In the 5 p.m. ET advisory, the Hurricane Center said Isaac remains a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds of 70 mph. Dry air, the center explains, keeps feeding into the storm keeping it from intensifying. The storm is predicted to make landfall near New Orleans as a category 2 hurricane with 100 mph winds.

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