features

NolaVie
12:55 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Urban Icons: Metairie's Muffler Man, battered and bruised by Isaac, down but not out

The Metairie Big Man after the storm.
Glen Abbott

He survived Hurricane Katrina and numerous tropical torments large and small.

But Isaac proved too much for Metairie’s Big Man statue, knocking him from the perch he’s occupied for more than 35 years near the corner of Clearview Parkway and West Napoleon Avenue, breaking off his head and one arm.

The two-story fiberglass “muffler man” has served as a landmark and company mascot for Clearview Auto Title & Notary since 1975, when business owner Sal Mortillaro purchased him for $400 from a New Orleans Midas Muffler shop.

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Inside the Arts
12:53 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Healing Art, A Case for Solomon and Truth Universal on Rap

Today you'll hear from renowned artist Richard Thomas, who takes us on a post Katrina healing journey... and we'll delve into a Louisiana kidnapping mystery, plus gain a little wisdom from the art of rap.

Music Reviews
11:41 am
Mon September 10, 2012

The Forgotten Story Of Memphis' American Studios

"Son of a Preacher Man" was Dusty Springfield's debut on Atlantic. The entire album that spawned it, Dusty in Memphis, was recorded at American Studios.
Stan Meagher Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 12:41 pm

Memphis has been a music town since anyone can remember, and it's had places to record that music since there have been records. Some of its studios — Sun, Stax and Hi — are well-known, but American Studios produced its share of hits, and yet it remains obscure. But that's all likely to change with Memphis Boys: The Story of American Studios, both a book and a CD out now.

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Education
6:18 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Students Say They've Been Denied The Right To Read

Michelle Johnson and her family talk about conditions within Detroit's Highland Park schools, in July.
Mike Glinski Mlive Detroit

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:08 pm

Eight Detroit-area public school students returning to classes this week are plaintiffs against a school system they say has failed them.

Their families and the American Civil Liberties Union say that the Highland Park school system has denied the students the right to learn to read, and that the state has a responsibility to fix that.

Michelle Johnson has five children in Highland Park schools. Her daughter is heading into the 12th grade, but can read at only about the fourth-grade level.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Jeremy Davenport: A Man & His Horn

  • Jeremy Davenport — A Man & His Horn

When jazz trumpeter Jeremy Davenport got off the road to take a lengthy engagement at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in New Orleans, he said no one seemed more surprised than his former boss — Harry Connick Jr. Davenport had traveled the world in Connick's band, which was and remains, hot stuff.

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Music Reviews
11:14 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Harmony, Teenagers And 'The Complete Story Of Doo-Wop'

Vocal groups like The Ink Spots went on for decades, often without a single member of the original group appearing with them.
Fred Ramage Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:31 am

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Joe South, Of 'Games People Play' Fame, Dies

Joe South, in 2009.
Rick Diamond Getty Images
  • A clip of Joe South, singing 'Games People Play'
  • A clip from Deep Purple doing 'Hush'

Joe South, who wrote such '60s and '70s hits as Games People Play and (I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack at his home in Buford, Ga. He was 72.

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Latin America
9:34 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Guess Who's Chopping Down The Amazon Now?

Loggers discuss the day's plan in a camp called Puesto Viejo, or "old post."
Carlos Villalon for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:20 pm

Though Brazil's Amazon has been the focus of environmental groups for decades, the deforestation rate there has fallen dramatically in recent years as clear-cutting of Amazonian jungle in eight other countries has started to rise.

As a result, the 40 percent of Amazonia located in a moon-shaped arc of countries from Bolivia to Colombia to French Guiana faces a more serious threat than the jungle in Brazil. The culprits range from ranching to soybean farming, logging to infrastructure development projects.

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Around the Nation
2:24 am
Wed September 5, 2012

The Strange Story Of The Man Behind 'Strange Fruit'

Abel Meeropol watches as his sons, Robert and Michael, play with a train set.
Courtesy of Robert and Michael Meeropol

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 2:37 pm

One of Billie Holiday's most iconic songs is "Strange Fruit," a haunting protest against the inhumanity of racism. Many people know that the man who wrote the song was inspired by a photograph of a lynching. But they might not realize that he's also tied to another watershed moment in America's history.

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Hurricane Isaac
5:37 pm
Mon September 3, 2012

Photo Essay: After Isaac

Heavy winds from Hurricane Isaac brought roof damage to many New Orleans structures like Upperline, a popular restaurant in the Uptown neighborhood.
Erin Krall

Photographer Erin Krall captured a glimpse of a city slowly returning to normal in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac.

You can find more of Erin's work on her website, and regularly here on WWNO.org.

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