features

Community Impact
7:59 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Neighborhood Partnerships Network Helps Communities Build Capacity

Crista Rock

The Neighborhoods Partnership Network (NPN) works to make all of New Orleans’ neighborhoods great places to live. NPN facilitates neighborhood collaboration, increase access to government and information, and strengthen the voices of individuals and communities across New Orleans.

 

On the Neighborhood Partnerships Network’s homepage, you’re one click away from finding out the meeting times and locations of dozens of different neighborhood organizations all over New Orleans.

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Features
7:51 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On New Orleans' Sauvé's Crevasse Flood Of 1849

New Orleans was inundated by Mississippi River waters in the spring of 1849. This oil painting by Elizabeth Lamoisse shows Canal Street at the time of the flood. "Landscape" by Elizabeth Lamoisse, 1848 - 1849, from the Louisiana State Museum.
Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:58 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

The Irresistible Deacon John Moore

Deacon John at the House of Blues in 2009.
Credit Jason Saul / American Routes

Go ahead, we DARE you. Try listening to this week's re-broadcast of Music Inside Out with Deacon John Moore and NOT enjoying yourself.

As a guitarist, band leader and showman, Deacon John has been delighting crowds for more than half a century. This year, he's played the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and the White House. He's just that irresistible.  

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Community Impact
7:46 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Ora Estuaries Contributes To An Oyster Habitat Restoration Project In St. Bernard Parish

Concrete rings are lowered into the water off the Biloxi Marsh.
Eve Abrams

The Water Challenge seeks to spur innovation in creative water management solutions for the Greater New Orleans region by awarding $50,000 annually through a competitive process. Sponsored by the Greater New Orleans Foundation, the Water Challenge is part of The Idea Village’s New Orleans Entrepreneur Week.

 

 

“This is the southern extent of the Biloxi Marshes,” points Tyler Ortego. “We’re right next to the southern extension of MRGO, less than a mile away. If you see higher vegetation that’s it. The other side of this lake you get out into Breton Sound.”

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Take Five
5:35 am
Mon June 9, 2014

An Independent Filmmaker In Hollywood South Makes 'Below Dreams'

The character Jamaine, in Below Dreams.
Credit Below Dreams

A few years ago, Garrett Bradley began taking Greyhound bus trips from her home in New York down to New Orleans.

 “I sort of was drawn here for some reason that I don’t think at the time I was really fully cognizant of,” said Bradley. “There was no kind of concrete reason.”

On these cross-country trips, Bradley would talk to her fellow passengers, asking them about “what it is they wanted in life and where they were going and how they planned on getting what they wanted.”

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Environment
12:41 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

Restoring The Coast By Creating Oyster Beds In St. Bernard Parish

Concrete oyster beds wait to be offloaded into St. Bernard's Lake Athanasio
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A consortium of environmental and industry stakeholders are making concrete reefs on the Gulf Coast in an attempt to create new oyster habitats. The Lake Athanasio project covers a half a mile of St. Bernard Parish coastline, and seeks to satisfy coastal restoration and commercial interests by giving oysters a sustainable habitat to mature.

Tyler Ortego developed the engineering concept behind the artificial reefs.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
4:32 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Dr. Michael White's Time Machine

Credit Derek Bridges / Flickr

What do you hear when Dr. Michael White plays his clarinet?

Can you hear the bayou? The river? The French Quarter? People sitting on their stoops waiting for someone to deliver the news? Penny parties?

That's not a clarinet in the doctor's hands; it's a time machine.

"I listened to Johnny Dodds' recordings. I listened to Sidney Bechet. I listened to George Lewis. I listened to Edmond Hall. I listened to Omer Simeon, Barney Bigard, and so many others," White says. "And you listen to that and you say, 'Wow, I would like to capture that feeling.'"

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: James Stram

James Stram.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Music
4:22 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Chart-Topping 'Chapel Of Love' Turns 50

The Dixie Cups in New York City in 1964, the year the group's song "Chapel of Love" hit No. 1 on the charts.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:49 pm

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: George Barisich

George Barisich.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Read more

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