A paper edit of a Music Inside Out interview.
Music Inside Out

Over the years at MIO, we’ve heard from an enormous variety of artists… Vocalists, pianists, guitarists and brass; composers, songwriters and producers; jazzmen, opera singers and artists that defy category. But no matter the background, style or vocation, all of our artists have a lot of stories to tell… so many, in fact, that we can’t always fit them in a single hour!

This week on Music Inside Out, we’re bringing you those all those clips that were just too good to leave on the cutting room floor!

Mallory Falk / WWNO

This school year, two high profile New Orleans charter schools attempted to form unions. One voted yes: International High School. One voted no: Lusher Charter School. In light of those votes, teachers around the city shared their perspective on unions since Katrina and where things might go from here.

The Provost Guard in New Orleans taking up Vagrant Negroes. (1974.25.9.190)
The Historic New Orleans Collection

It was June. It was hot. Kids were out of school, keeping busy outdoors. Parents were inside. Kind of like how it is now, except it was 146 years ago.

A section of the Big Branch Wildlife Refuge smolders.
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

On a clear spring afternoon recently, a massive column of smoke rose up near Lacombe, on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain. People reported seeing it from across the water. Down below, a fire was raging.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Something big has been decided about New Orleans schools. And it seemed to happen pretty fast. Governor John Bel Edwards has now signed legislation ordering that all New Orleans schools return to the control of the Orleans Parish School Board. But not nearly as much control as that board had before Katrina. Things will look very different than they did a decade ago.

Forever young.
Music Inside Out

In case you’re wondering — yes, this is a Best of Music Inside Out program. But the topic is universal. The songs we hear as children — even the ones we don’t like — help shape our feelings about the music we love as adults.

Historic New Orleans Collection; Gift of Michael Adler [2008.0038.15]

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with a two-part series on tourism, starting with the city’s relationship to the industry, and how we became dependent on it.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Even as the price of oil drops, and offshore drilling slows down, huge amounts of crude oil keep flowing into Louisiana’s oil ports. The biggest is LOOP, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. It’s a major pass-through point for a lot of U.S. crude. But instead of heading out to refineries, oil is being stockpiled at LOOP.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The oil and gas downturn has resulted in a loss of about 12,000 jobs across Louisiana over the past year. Many of those jobs are concentrated in smaller metropolitan areas, like the Cajun city of Lafayette, which has lost the most. The city that once boomed as a result of oil and gas activity is now struggling to not go bust.


This spring, families who applied to New Orleans public schools got some bad news. School placements were announced a week late. Why was that such a big deal? Many private school deposits were due. Families had to decide: pay up to reserve a seat or take a chance with the public charter school lottery, OneApp. More New Orleans families - those with enough resources - find themselves choosing between public and private education.

Jeneane Watson always assumed she’d send her kids to public school. That was the norm where she grew up, outside Baltimore.