environment

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Ten years after Katrina, the Army Corps of Engineers says it is ready for the next big one. The Corps has built new levees, floodwalls and gated structures over the past decade to protect the city and its people.

Examining the Gulf Coast's master plan

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary

When you talk to some residents along the Louisiana coast about rebuilding after Katrina, they'll say it almost doesn't matter if you rebuild the area unless its protected from another storm — and like many things, that hinges on money.

Fighting Invasives

Aug 21, 2015

Invasive plants can be an exhausting problem for landowners.  It is an issue at Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge, where Chinese Tallow attempts to run wild.

"It is not too horrible at the refuge just yet, which is why we need to catch it early," says Nova Clarke, a ranger at Black Bayou.  "We want to prevent it from becoming a losing battle."

A gubernatorial forum on coastal issues, put on by the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, was held Tuesday evening at Nicholls State University. It had all four of the major candidates in agreement on the importance of working to avert Louisiana’s land loss.


A federal rule that revises which bodies of water are subject to the Clean Water Act will take effect Aug. 28. Some Louisiana farmers are concerned that the new Clean Water Rule is overreaching.

The biggest change is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is defining ditches, according to LSU Ag Center water policy economist Naveen Adusumilli. Any ditch that is part of a tributary or connected to a previously jurisdictional waterway would now have to be in compliance with the Clean Water Act.

St. Bernard Parish from the air.
Jesse Hardman

A coalition of wetlands restoration advocates are using the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina to push their cause, rebuilding marsh along the Mississippi Delta. The MRGO Must Go Coalition wants to remind local residents that Hurricane Katrina’s impact was largely due to environmental degradation caused by private and public entities.

In a lush green bayou a little southeast of New Orleans, John Lopez and Howard Callahan are cruising the waterways in an airboat under the hot Louisiana sun on a recent day.

It's an area known as Breton Basin, and Callahan is a local land manager who often helps researchers such as Lopez explore environmental changes in coastal wetlands. The pair head to a concrete and steel structure that separates the bayou from the nearby Mississippi River.

Joe Shriner

On this week's episode of Louisiana Eats!, we visit two Gulf Coast farms where, through collaboration and innovation, farmers are creating better products that will help preserve the environment and give back to the community.

Jesse Hardman

This week on All Things New Orleans, WWNOs weekly local magazine:

Eve Abrams helps us explore some often used but misunderstand labels being placed on New Orleanians who arrived AFTER the storm. We share our latest episode of our podcast, Katrina: The Debris, focusing on mental health and disasters.

Brown Pelicans recovering at the Fort Jackson bird rehabilitation center in the aftermath of the BP oil spill.
Jason Saul

The announcement of a settlement over BP oil spill claims means that billions of dollars could come to the state of Louisiana over the next decade. Much of that money will help fund restoration projects as part of the state’s coastal master plan.

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