environment

More than 150 people crowded the Belle Chasse Auditorium, many of them making their case to representatives from the Department of Natural Resources.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A public hearing on a proposed coal export terminal in Plaquemines parish drew a big crowd on Thursday.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A federal agency that oversees offshore leasing wants input on the environmental impacts of drilling in the Gulf. The Bureau of Offshore Energy Management, or BOEM, is one of two government agencies that regulate the offshore industry. It held a meeting in New Orleans Thursday as part of its role of leasing drilling rights throughout the Gulf.

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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Cypress trees in Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge, stretching across Cameron and Evangeline Parishes in southwestern Louisiana.
Steve Hillebrand / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Hurricane Rita came ashore just three weeks after Hurricane Katrina, killing seven people directly and over a hundred more in the evacuation and in the storm's aftermath.

Ten years later, many residents of southwest Louisiana are feeling forgotten as the international media spotlight stays focused on New Orleans.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

St. Bernard Parish officials want to raise awareness of how the parish was affected by Hurricane Katrina ten years ago. The parish is holding its own Katrina 10 events this week, featuring art displays, public banners indicating the level of water the area took, parish first response offices, and visits to Army Corps of Engineers flood protection projects.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Ten years after Katrina, the Army Corps of Engineers says it is ready for the next big one. The Corps has built new levees, floodwalls and gated structures over the past decade to protect the city and its people.

Examining the Gulf Coast's master plan

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary

When you talk to some residents along the Louisiana coast about rebuilding after Katrina, they'll say it almost doesn't matter if you rebuild the area unless its protected from another storm — and like many things, that hinges on money.

Fighting Invasives

Aug 21, 2015

Invasive plants can be an exhausting problem for landowners.  It is an issue at Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge, where Chinese Tallow attempts to run wild.

"It is not too horrible at the refuge just yet, which is why we need to catch it early," says Nova Clarke, a ranger at Black Bayou.  "We want to prevent it from becoming a losing battle."

A gubernatorial forum on coastal issues, put on by the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, was held Tuesday evening at Nicholls State University. It had all four of the major candidates in agreement on the importance of working to avert Louisiana’s land loss.


A federal rule that revises which bodies of water are subject to the Clean Water Act will take effect Aug. 28. Some Louisiana farmers are concerned that the new Clean Water Rule is overreaching.

The biggest change is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is defining ditches, according to LSU Ag Center water policy economist Naveen Adusumilli. Any ditch that is part of a tributary or connected to a previously jurisdictional waterway would now have to be in compliance with the Clean Water Act.

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