Education

Law
3:04 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Hazing Hard To Prosecute In Fla. Despite Tough Laws

Pam and Robert Champion hold their son's drum major hat from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Robert Champion Jr. died after a hazing incident in November.
Jim Burress for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 6:28 pm

Charges filed this week against 13 people in connection with a hazing death at Florida A&M University have thrust the hazing culture into the spotlight.

Florida has one of the toughest anti-hazing laws in the country, but legal experts say prosecuting the crime can be tricky.

State attorney Lawson Lamar, who is leading the prosecution in the death of drum major Robert Champion, acknowledges the case is complicated.

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Around the Nation
5:37 am
Fri May 4, 2012

13 Charged In Florida A&M Hazing Case

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 8:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Education
2:02 am
Fri May 4, 2012

For College Seniors, One Last Lap Before Graduation

The pool at Bryn Mawr College's Bern Schwartz Fitness and Athletic Center. Bryn Mawr is one of a handful of colleges that requires students to pass a swimming test to graduate.
Courtesy of Bryn Mawr College

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 8:57 am

It's spring, the season when many college students are cramming for final exams. But it's also when some college seniors must prove they can literally stay afloat.

A swim test is still a graduation requirement on a handful of U.S. campuses, mostly in the Northeast. For seniors who have been putting off the exam, it's time to sink or swim.

A Shrinking Tradition

On a recent evening, a handful of seniors at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pa., gather nervously at the edge of the campus pool, waiting to take the last swim test of the school year.

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Education
5:05 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Top Universities Expand Free Online Classes

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 9:31 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Harvard and MIT are investing $60 million into a joint venture called edX. Its mission is to provide interactive university classes online for free to anyone in the world. It's the latest move by top universities to expand their intellectual reach through the Internet. And as NPR's Steve Henn reports, some are calling this effort transformational.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: Susan Hockfield is MIT's president. She believes there's never been a better time to be in higher education.

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Education
4:26 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Cal State Faculty On Strike Amid A 'Scary Future'

California Faculty Association Vice President Douglas Domingo-Foraste (right) helps Cal State, Long Beach, professor Mark Sugars vote last month on whether to authorize a strike. The strike was authorized Wednesday.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 9:44 am

California State University, the nation's largest four-year, public university system, is in trouble. Wednesday, professors authorized a strike over working conditions and pay, and students began a hunger strike demanding a tuition freeze.

The faculty authorization allows for two-day strikes at each of the schools in system, one after the other. A strike date is pending, though, and will only take place if negotiations fail.

This unfolding crisis is the result of massive state cuts in funding that have pushed higher education in California to the breaking point.

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All Tech Considered
4:26 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Explosion In Free Online Classes May Change Course Of Higher Education

It's become much cheaper and easier to offer classes online.
Matjaz Boncina iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 9:44 am

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are teaming up in a $60 million venture to provide classes online for free. The move is the latest by top universities to expand their intellectual reach through the Internet — a trend that is changing higher education.

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Economy
3:11 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Coming Of Age In An Ever-Recovering Economy

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 5:26 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

While California's state budget woes have contributed to the stress on public university kids there, students across the country are feeling the squeeze in other ways. More than 7 million students could face a doubling of their federal loan rates if Congress can't agree on a plan to prevent it. At the same time, students of all backgrounds are coming of age in an era when the economy is always described as recovering, never recovered.

So with graduation coming up, how are they feeling about their prospects?

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Education
1:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

The Ten Things You Won't Hear At Commencement

Elmira College graduates gather at their 2010 commencement.
Elmira College Flickr

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 10:35 am

Every spring, new graduates sit through commencement addresses full of advice to seize the day, dream big and make the world a better place.

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Education
1:04 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

The Best Ways To Integrate Special Needs Students

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 1:50 pm

Budget cuts in many school districts have some parents and teachers questioning whether they have the resources to support their students. NPR education correspondent Claudio Sanchez and Thomas Hehir of Harvard University talk about how to integrate special needs students into mainstream classrooms.

Planet Money
2:20 am
Wed May 2, 2012

How Colleges Fight For Top Students

"My mom opened the letter and she called me and told me I got the Marquis Scholarship. And she's like, 'It's a humungous scholarship!'" -Michele Tallarita
Jacob Goldstein NPR

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 2:56 pm

It's a gray April evening, and two men have driven from Easton, Pa., to Manhattan. The men are administrators at Lafayette College. They're wearing solid black suits with Lafayette pins on their lapels.

They're here to see 12 students — high school seniors who have been admitted to Lafayette and are trying to decide where to go to college.

The men have come to make the students "feel that Lafayette is in their future and make them think that they'll ruin their lives if they go elsewhere," says Greg MacDonald, Lafayette's dean of admissions.

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