Education

Law
3:42 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

Ex-Rutgers Student Sentenced In Webcam Spying Case

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 7:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. Now to the sentencing of Dharun Ravi. He's the Rutgers University student who was convicted in a high profile cyber-bullying case on charges including a hate crime.

Ravi could have faced as much as 10 years in jail. Today, he was sentenced to far less: 30 days. He first got into trouble for using a webcam to spy on his gay roommate at Rutgers and then tweeted about it. The roommate, Tyler Clementi, killed himself soon afterwards.

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Education
1:24 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

Students Find It's Tough To Graduate In Four Years

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 2:35 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Only a little over half of fulltime students graduate with a bachelor's degree within six years of starting college. Educators blame the low rate on students who decide to adjust their course loads, take time off or drop out of school altogether.

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Andre Perry Commentary
5:00 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

Pomp and Circumstance

It’s that time of year when Edward Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 is played to the delight of millions of graduates in high school and college. The selection of a march is appropriate given that students must face a certain rise in college tuition and an antagonistic job market. For good or for bad, the credentials of a high school diploma and college degree pave a one-lane bridge to economic and social independence.

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Around the Nation
2:17 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Son Fulfills Dream Racism Denied To His Mother

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 3:49 pm

When Terry Walls of Springfield, Mo., decided to go back to college at age 52, he wanted to put to rest a family rumor. He had heard his mother was denied admission to Missouri State University, and he was pointed toward Meyer Library on the MSU campus for answers.

There, he discovered an eloquent letter typed on fragile, onion-skin paper and signed with his mother's maiden name: Mary Jean Price. It was dated Oct. 2, 1950, and it was addressed to the university registrar:

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Religion
3:52 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Grad. Speaker A Political Choice At Catholic Schools

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 1:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of Health and Human Services, will address students at Georgetown University tomorrow.

As NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports, that has created one of several controversies this season over commencement speakers.

BARBARA BRADLEY HAGERTY, BYLINE: Sebelius is Catholic. She's also liberal and pro-choice. And the fact that she's speaking to Georgetown's Public Policy Institute makes conservative Catholics, like Patrick Reilly, see red.

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Education
3:33 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Janitor Cleans Up, Gets Ivy League Diploma

Columbia University janitor Gac Filipaj shakes hands with his boss, Donald Schlosser, the assistant vice president of facility operations.
Jason DeCrow AP

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 4:58 pm

Gac Filipaj is thrilled that he graduated this week from Columbia University.

"I'm still wearing the gown. I'm going to wear it for awhile," he told Tell Me More host Michel Martin just after Columbia's commencement ceremony. "And I look pretty well in that, to tell you the truth."

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Around the Nation
11:51 am
Thu May 17, 2012

After Tornado Devastates, Joplin High Bounces Back

The main entrance of Joplin High School was severely damaged in a May 2011 tornado.
Mark Schiefelbein AP

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 3:33 pm

Nearly one year ago, a devastating tornado ripped through the city of Joplin, Mo. The tornado was the deadliest in the U.S in almost 60 years, killing 161 people and injuring more than 900. But life for Joplin's residents is finally starting to return to normal.

That includes life for students at Joplin High School. The school was destroyed by the tornado just hours after last year's commencement ceremony. Although the school's old location is still in ruins, the city has found a temporary solution to keep classes going.

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Around the Nation
11:10 am
Thu May 17, 2012

A Year Later, Joplin Continues To Bounce Back

A year after a devastating tornado ripped through Joplin, Missouri, President Obama is set to go back and deliver Joplin High School's commencement speech. Host Michel Martin speaks with Joplin High Principal Kerry Sachetta for an update on how the school and the town are recovering.

Education
3:13 pm
Wed May 16, 2012

Fla. Students Crash After State Raises Bar On Test

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 6:34 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Those who want to raise standards on student achievement tests have suffered an embarrassing setback in Florida. The state made its writing exam harder and results plummeted. So the state is backtracking. It's now lowering its passing score and admitting something went wrong.

Sarah Gonzalez of member station WLRN has that story.

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NPR Story
10:32 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Why So Many Ph.D.s Are On Food Stamps

The number of people with graduate degrees — master's degrees and doctorates — who have had to apply for food stamps, unemployment or other assistance more than tripled between 2007 and 2010.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 7:16 pm

With the economic troubles of the past few years, it's no surprise that the number of people using food stamps is soaring. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that an average of 44 million people were on food assistance last year; that's up from 17 million in 2000.

What might be surprising, though, is one subgroup that's taken a particularly hard hit.

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