education

Amy Jeffries / Southern Education Desk

The big push for charter schools in Louisiana started after Hurricane Katrina. The state's Recovery School District took over most of the public schools in New Orleans, and quickly issued charters.

With charter school enrollment up to nearly 3 million nationwide last year, Louisiana was still among the states adding the most students.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Charter schools are changing American education. Some say for the better, some say for the worse. This week the Southern Education Desk looks at the charter school movement throughout the south: the similarities and differences between states, and a glimpse at what's ahead. The series starts in New Orleans, the testing ground for the charter movement. Nearly all the city's public schools have been converted into charters: publicly funded, but privately run. Since then, a major lesson has emerged.

On Sept. 15, 2005, two weeks after Katrina and the levee breaches, I drove with my parents into New Orleans. It was my 25th birthday.

We used my press pass from The Village Voice to get past a military checkpoint so we could assess the damage to their home near Tulane University. It turned out to be minimal: a few slate tiles off the roof, tree limbs downed, a putrid refrigerator full of rotting food to drag to the curb.

Katrina kid: Growing up after the flood

Aug 14, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

It's been 10 years since Hurricane Katrina and the flood-of-floods struck New Orleans. In the following decade, the city has transformed it public schools, housing, and business community. Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio traveled to the city to explore what these vast changes mean for New Orleans and the country. 

 

Summer vacation is gone and family conversations have turned to talk of the new school year.

Seated in the living room of their home in Sterlington, Katie hears what her children look forward to heading back to class. 12-year-old Matthew is ready to catch up with friends. “I’m looking forward to new classes, meeting some new friends,” he says.

Charting New Orleans' charter school experiment

Aug 13, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

It's been 10-years since Hurricane Katrina and the flood-of-floods struck New Orleans. In the following decade, the city has transformed it public schools, housing, and business community. Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio traveled to the city to explore what these vast changes mean for New Orleans and the country. 

Student performance has improved in the years since Hurricane Katrina, according to researchers at Tulane University. The Education Research Alliance released new findings on Tuesday.

The report looks at student performance on state tests. It finds a typical student's scores rose 8 to 15 points.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many school leaders and policymakers are weighing in on New Orleans' education system. But what about families? At a recent panel, parents took to the stage to reflect on the past 10 years.

Eight parents were featured speakers on the panel. They talked about enrollment, governance and accountability.

lden Richard teaches cybersecurity to a group of educators from around the U.S.
UNO

Tuesday was the first day of summer camp at the University of New Orleans, but there will be no letters home to Mom and Dad — this one is a summer camp for teachers. It is the second year of the GenCyber program.

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many reporters are looking at post storm progress through the lens of New Orleans' education system. Two recent articles in particular caught WWNO education reporter Mallory Falk's eye. Falk spoke to Danielle Dreilinger of NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune and Emmanuel Felton, a staff writer for The Hechinger Report, about their recent looks into discipline and corruption in New Orleans schools.

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