education

Latest News
5:09 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Lawmakers Reject Tweaks To TOPS Tuition Program

Lissandra Melo Shutterstock

The House Education Committee shot down a bill that would change eligibility for Louisiana's TOPS program and require repayment of the free college tuition if students lose their awards.

Napoleonville Representative Joe Harrison was pushing the TOPS changes as a way to cut costs for a program expected to cost about $235 million next year.

Several lawmakers said they were worried about the long-term financial stability of the program, but that didn't generate enough votes for Harrison's proposal to put limits on the popular program.

Education
8:35 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Services For Non-English Speaking Families Often Lacking In New Orleans Schools

Karen Gadbois Flickr

For decades, New Orleans’ largest bilingual community has been Vietnamese-American. Now, since Katrina, the number of Spanish-speaking families has been growing rapidly.

Reporter Katy Reckdahl has been looking at services for both of those growing communities in New Orleans’ public schools. She found the charter system and One App programs can make language services more complicated.

Read more
Education
8:30 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Wilson Charter School Embraces Students New To English

Sister Juanita Wood reads with a group of Spanish speaking kindergardeners.
Eve Abrams

When Logan Crowe became Principal of Andrew H. Wilson Charter School three years ago, the school had fewer than 10 non-English-speaking students.

Crowe actively recruited native Spanish speakers from New Orleans' swelling Latino population, and this year Wilson has 61 English as a Second Language students enrolled... but no funds to hire a full time ESL teacher.

Sister Juanita Wood, a bilingual nun near retirement, volunteered for the task and is paid a part-time stipend.

Read more
WRKF
5:42 am
Mon March 24, 2014

First Bell: It Took a Hurricane to Get this Student Reading

Chris Vasser

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 8:25 pm

The First Bell series is a growing collection of stories from students, parents, and educators about pivotal experiences in education. To tell your story, email amy@wrkf.org with "My First Bell" in the subject line or tweet with the hashtag #MyFirstBell.

__________

Vasser was not a good student in 2005.

When Hurricane Katrina forced him to move out of New Orleans and transfer to Catholic High in Baton Rouge, he had to turn it around.


Read more
WRKF
3:03 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Student Data: Private Property or Shared Resource?

Louisiana parents gave the House and Senate education committees an earful last week.

“There seems to be no effective safeguard in law to protect our children’s information from the whim and will of BESE and LDE,” said Sara Wood of Mandeville.

She was talking about data privacy. Seven bills have been filed this session, each trying to prohibit how much individual information about Louisiana students is shared—and with whom.

Read more
education
7:36 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Morris Jeff Community School Teachers Unionize

Tiana Nobile and Rowan Shafer are co-presidents of the Morris Jeff Association of Educators.
Eve Abrams WWNO

One idea behind charter schools is that they operate with few outside restrictions. They can play around with curriculum, the structure of the school day and staffing. Teachers unions tend to create restrictions on things like hours and duties in order to protect the people who work in schools.

Morris Jeff Community School is the first charter school in Louisiana to form a teachers union that’s recognized by the school’s board. In fact, at Morris Jeff the very term teachers union has a whole new meaning.

Read more
Louisiana Eats!
5:00 am
Fri March 21, 2014

NOCCA's Culinary Arts Program Serves Up 'The Dish That Makes A Difference'

This year's competitors: Chefs Quanna Bourgeois, Landry Duchane and Arieanna McKnight.
Credit NOCCA Institute

Each year NOCCA’s culinary arts program invites restaurateurs, chefs and media representatives to attend a cook off between three culinary students. It's for The Dish That Makes a Difference, a friendly competition that places the winning dish in more than a dozen restaurants around town.

Read more
WRKF
3:02 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Parents Mobilizing Over Common Core

Whether you love it--like Vera Collins of Jefferson Parish, who says, “Louisiana’s Common Core State Standards is vital to making the dream a reality”—or hate it, like Ralph Roshto of Lacombe, who says, “Supporting Common Core is like a chicken supporting Colonel Sanders,”—Common Core is driving parents to the state capitol in droves.

But just what is this education issue that’s polarizing Louisiana moms and dads?

Read more
WRKF
3:02 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Repealing Unconstitutional Law

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:45 pm

It might seem obvious…when the U.S. Supreme Court rules a state law “unconstitutional”, then the state repeals that law. Baton Rouge Senator Dan Claitor has been trying to get one of those old laws off the books for several years now, but prior attempts never made it past the first hurdle—the Senate Education Committee. This time his repeal bill, SB 70, has made it to the Senate floor, and it’s eligible for debate there as early as today.

Read more
WRKF
4:02 am
Mon March 17, 2014

First Bell: State Superintendent's Lunch Hour Lessons

State Superintendent John White

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 8:27 pm

The First Bell series is a growing collection of stories from students, parents, and educators about pivotal experiences in education. To tell your story, email amy@wrkf.org with "My First Bell" in the subject line or tweet with the hashtag #MyFirstBell.

__________ 

When state Superintendent John White was playing sports in high school, he says the poverty of the kids who lived a mile or two away from him came into view.

"I think there was something always, in a way, powerful, about being in a low-income community’s home court. Because, when you come in with your nice uniforms and, you know, you practice everyday in a nice gym or on a nice field, and you play guys whose uniforms don’t quite look the way they should, or the gym’s in bad shape, and the field is also a soccer, also a baseball, also a something else field, you get a very material view of what inequity looks like."

White found the disparity was something he couldn’t turn his back on.

He now oversees the education of Louisiana’s roughly 700,000 public school students. But he started his career teaching English in a high-poverty high school in Jersey City, NJ.

He says he never considered a career in private education, even though he went to an elite all-boys school — St. Albans in Washington, D.C. — from elementary school all the way through 12th grade. And he loved it.


Read more

Pages