education

Sean Locke Photography / Shutterstock

It's only January, but one New Orleans high school has already held a graduation ceremony. The NET Charter High School is a small alternative school with just 150 students. Many dropped out of or were expelled from their previous schools.

Last weekend 19 of them received diplomas at the school's largest ever graduation ceremony.

When low-income students apply to school in New Orleans, they have three options: a handful of traditional public schools, mostly charter public schools, and private schools with voucher programs. How do these students and their families choose an option? A new study from Tulane's Education Research Alliance explores this question.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As 2015 winds down, we thought we'd take a look back at the year in education. WWNO's Education Reporter Mallory Falk has been covering New Orleans' almost all-charter system, in an ongoing measurement and monitoring of school reform since Hurricane Katrina.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Some cities have a range of programs for children with severe mental health needs: outpatient clinics, residential hospitals, therapeutic boarding schools. New Orleans isn’t one of them.

The city already had limited options when it shuttered its adolescent psychiatric hospital back in 2009. Now kids can receive some treatment in school or at home, or check into a hospital outside the city. But there's a new option for children with mental health needs.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Voter ID Laws. Felon Rights. These topics aren’t foreign for teachers and students in Southern classrooms. But what happens when pressure to teach to the test prevents challenging conversations?

Sandra Knispel

In Mississippi, the Civil War still stirs emotions. It’s not so much that teachers disagree on how it should be taught, but that ongoing attempts by the University of Mississippi and several cities across the South to shed Confederate symbols have called up old ghosts. Mississippi Public Broadcasting's Sandra Knispel reports for the Southern Education Desk.

KIDsmART

Over the past year, local educational organizations have joined a new program funded by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. It’s called Any Given Child and it helps schools integrate artistic lessons into their curriculum. Echo Olander of KIDsmART has been essential to the program’s local development, and spoke with NolaVie’s Renee Peck about what they’ve learned and where they’re going.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

What should school children be taught about Islam? In Southern states such as Florida and North Carolina, parents claim students are being “indoctrinated” with a sanitized version of the Muslim faith. One of the fiercest fights so far is going on right now in Tennessee, possibly revealing the playbook for future battles.

Usama Dakdok, a traveling speaker, addressed an overflow crowd of about 300 people recently at the Christian Life First Assembly of God in the small Middle Tennessee town of Sparta.

Dan Carsen

Teaching subjects that trigger strong emotions and political divides is challenging. In the South, many of those fault-lines -- racial, religious and otherwise -- are intimately tied to its history. This week the Southern Education Desk is exploring how teachers tackle tough topics.

Courtesy

Think back on how you first learned about Thanksgiving. You might have been told the Native Americans and Pilgrims came together in peace and everything was harmonious. Years later, you realized the story is more complicated. But what if you learned the full story from the start?

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