economy

Terrebonne Parish Rebranding
11:31 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Terrebonne Parish to present new logo, slogan

Terrebonne Parish is keeping a tight wrap on the new logo and slogan it plans to unveil Thursday, but the director of the Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center says they won't be surprising.

Janel Ricca tells The Courier that's because the new rebranding reinforces the parish's natural identity.

In Ricca's words, "It's going to be obvious, but it should be because it is authentic."

The new brand was created with part of the parish's $2.1 million share of $78 million that BP PLC gave Louisiana for tourism after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010.

Arts & Life
10:48 am
Mon July 16, 2012

A Writer's 'Cold, Calculated Acts Of Kindness'

After he was laid off in 2008, writer T.M. Shine adopted a unique approach to finding a job. He says his new goal is being nice to people, and he put that right at the top of his resume. Host Michel Martin speaks with Shine about his journey from unemployment back to work, which he wrote about for this week's Washington Post Magazine.

Economy
10:48 am
Mon July 16, 2012

AFSCME: Attacks On Public Sector Harm Middle Class

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, one of the country's largest unions, is facing a difficult climate. Local governments are slashing employee pensions and state governments are considering measures to curb collective bargaining rights. Host Michel Martin talks with Lee Saunders, AFSCME's new president.

The Two-Way
7:41 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Retail Sales Dip For Third Straight Month, But Are Still Up From Year Earlier

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 7:49 am

The bad news: Retail sales fell 0.5 percent in June from May, the Census Bureau says. It's the third straight month that sales have been down from the month before.

But, Census adds that June sales were 3.8 percent above the pace of June 2011. And, "sales for the April through June 2012 period were up 4.7 percent ... from the same period a year ago."

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Asia
6:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Slowed Growth Reflects China's Uphill Battle

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 10:11 am

No country has enjoyed more spectacular growth in recent decades than China. But the economy that will one day replace America's as the world's largest also faces a lot of challenges. Guest host David Greene talks to NPR's Frank Langfitt, who was a reporter in China in the '90s and returned to Shanghai for NPR last year.

Economy
4:52 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

A Tale Of Two Cities: Too Many Jobs, Or Not Enough

Agriculture is a key job sector in Yuma, Ariz., where the seasonal workforce and migrant labor tend to boost the unemployment rate.
Jacob Lopez AP

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 5:12 pm

Maria Arvizu continues to fill out job applications even though she has yet to deposit her last paycheck.

Arvizu, 53, relocated to Yuma, Ariz., to become a bus driver for the local school district last year. After school closed for summer break, she was caught off guard when she was laid off. She had expected to get another driving assignment and was denied collecting unemployment because she was still considered a school employee.

"I just keep looking for a job," Arvizu says.

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Energy
4:20 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Miners Weather The Slow Burn Of Coal's Demise

Equipment for transporting and housing coal sits idle in Cowen, W.Va. Since the natural gas boom, several mines in Webster County have either slowed or shut down operation, laying off hundreds of workers.
Guy Raz NPR

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 7:21 pm

At some point today, you will probably flip on a light switch. That simple action connects you to the oldest and most plentiful source of American electricity: coal.

Since the early 1880s — when Edison and Tesla pioneered the distribution of electrical power into our homes — most of that power has come from the process of burning coal.

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Louisiana Peach Festival
11:23 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Peach fest impact grows

RUSTON — The 2012 Louisiana Peach Festival pumped a record of about $5.3 million into the Lincoln Parish economy, according to the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce.

The Daily Leader reports (http://bit.ly/NkX2jt) the economic impact estimate tops the previous high of $4.6 million set in 2006.

Figures released by the chamber, which produces the festival, show attendance rose to 19,837, a slight increase over 2011.

NPR Story
6:49 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Toil And Trouble: Eurozone Pot Continues To Boil

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:54 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

There's more gloomy news from the eurozone this week. Italy saw its sovereign debt rating lowered by one agency, at just a couple of notches above junk status. In Spain, civil servants, coalminers, and others took to the streets once again to protest more spending cuts and tax hikes. And Germany's highest court heard arguments challenging the constitutionality of two measures considered central to efforts to try to contain the euro crisis.

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World
4:49 am
Sat July 14, 2012

Vive La France ... And Its High Taxes On The Wealthy

A French military brass band parades on the Champs-Elysee during a rehearsal as part of the Bastille Day celebrations, which take place Saturday.
Loic Venance AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:54 pm

As the French people celebrate their revolution on Saturday, Bastille Day, the founding principles — liberte, egalite and fraternite — seem to be alive and well.

New President Francois Hollande embraced equality on the campaign trail this spring. To reduce the French deficit, he proposed raising taxes on large corporations and the super-rich. The move helped his campaign take off, says Gerald Andrieu, a political journalist with Marianne magazine.

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