delgado community college

Eve Abrams

Southeast Louisiana Legal Services helps people tackle civil legal issues for a stronger, safer, better life.

James Welch is a staff attorney at Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, and two days a week he works at a place called Single Stop.

“We have so many students who come in here when they just need a rest, a place to come where no one is snarling at them,” laughs Welch. “Unfortunately, it’s tough. This is like an oasis.”

It’s getting easier for students to transfer from Delgado Community College to Loyola University.

The New Orleans Advocate reports the two schools signed a deal that allows students who complete prescribed courses in any of 10 programs at Delgado to transfer their credits to one of 28 programs at Loyola.

Eligible Delgado programs include accounting, business administration, criminal justice, fine arts, humanities, mass communication, social science, biological sciences and physical sciences.

Delgado Community College will be getting $2.5 million for workforce training.

Vice President Joe Biden announced the 270 community colleges across the country that would receive money to train people for jobs expected in their areas.

Delgado will be focusing on energy and advanced manufacturing jobs.

Employers involved in the program include ExxonMobil, Lockheed Martin and Phillips6,

Delgado will offer training programs that meet employer and industry needs. 

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A new Delgado Community College campus opened today in New Orleans’s Desire neighborhood. The Sidney Collier campus will initially focus on courses in cosmetology, barbering, H-VAC, electrical work and nursing. 

The new building is on the former site of a popular technical college that was destroyed in Hurricane Katrina.  It gives access to courses geared towards industries that are thriving locally to people living in the Eastern part of the city.

Thomas Lovince is the executive dean of the new Delgado campus.

Corporate Realty / The Lens

The ArtWorks building near Lee Circle is up for sale once again. The $25 million, 93,000-square-foot building was built as a creative space for artists, but closed its doors 2 years ago after having financial trouble. Now, two groups are bidding to purchase the space.

About 10 percent of Delgado Community College's 465 employees will be laid off at the end of next month.

Chancellor Monty Sullivan said Tuesday the layoffs are a consequence of the school's $13 million deficit and declining enrollment. Sullivan says no teachers will lose their jobs in this action.

College spokeswoman Carol Gniady tells The Times-Picayune the 46 people who will lose their jobs are classified and unclassified employees, categories that include secretaries, clerks, bookkeepers and maintenance personnel.

After six years of post-Katrina growth, Delgado Community College reported an 11.4 percent drop in the number of full-time students who registered for the fall semester.

Even with this decline from its all-time-high total of 20,452 students last fall, Delgado remains the most populous local institution of higher education, with 18,115 students at eight locations around the New Orleans area.

Delgado spokesman Tony Cook tells The Times-Picayune that at least some of Delgado's decline is the result of a policy change.

The Navy has given Delgado Community College a $10 million grant to help enhance its advanced manufacturing programs at the Avondale shipyard in suburban New Orleans.

Avondale, owned by Huntington Ingalls Industries, is scheduled to close in 2013 after two Navy ships currently under construction there are launched. But officials say the skills being taught are applicable not only to shipbuilding but to other industries, too.

Delgado Chancellor Monty Sullivan says the investment will have a major effect on the economic future of New Orleans and the entire Gulf Coast.