community

Out To Lunch: Giving
Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

In 2005, many of us in New Orleans found ourselves in a position we could never have imagined. Homeless. Our place of work closed down. Our insurance companies refusing to compensate us. And our government largely useless.

Until then it was just a cliché. But the kindness of strangers saved our lives. And our city. It is no exaggeration to say that in those dire days New Orleans was resurrected by good people and charitable organizations.

Last week’s TriPod saw an example of solidarity in opposition to slavery among people of African descent. But the dynamics within enslaved communities were complicated, and it was far from one big brotherhood. Allegiances were not automatic, and the story of a runaway named Francisque, who found his way to New Orleans in 1766, shows just that.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Anointed Hands Boxing Gym on Pontchartrain Drive in Slidell is a modest facility, filled with loud music and kids. It is kind of like a community center — the coach taught a group of kids how to hit the boxing bags while others played on gym equipment and parents joked at the front desk.
 

 It is not necessarily what you would expect at a boxing gym. That could be because the owners, Dupre and Shedee Strickland, aim to do more than offer training for aspiring boxers — they want to help.

Robert Warren

In the past ten years, New Orleans has become known nationwide for education reform through charter schools. It's also earned a reputation as a hub for entrepreneurship. Those two worlds are coming together.

Louisiana Appleseed

Louisiana Appleseed recruits professionals to donate pro bono time to solve problems at their root cause. Their goal is to advance social justice by creating change at a systemic level. Louisiana Appleseed’s projects seek to increase access to education, opportunity and justice.

“Hey did you want to talk for a second?” asks Christy Kane from behind a table at Dillard University’s Housing Fair.

Eve Abrams

New Orleans has ten KIPP schools serving grades Kindergarten through 12th.. KIPP New Orleans also has a program called KIPP Through College, which supports KIPP middle school and high school alumni on their path to and through college.

Have a question about why your block floods? Or the state of our sewerage and water system? Regional plans for flood protection? What you can do to help make your neighborhood safer from flooding?

Join WWNO's Eve Troeh and experts for a community conversation this Saturday, November 7, at Sojourner Truth Community Center, 2200 Lafitte Ave. RSVP here and/or submit a question.

We'll hear from:

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The National Alliance on Mental Illness in St. Tammany Parish is trying something a little new: training people who have mental illnesses to help people with similar problems.

Roxanne Skal is a Peer Support Specialist. She works with a variety of people, both in community support groups and at the Northlake Behavioral Health Center in Mandeville. A couple times a week, she drives from her office on one side of Northlake’s campus to a little brown brick house on the other side, where she leads a group for recovering alcoholics.

The Tulane Environmental Studies Program joins with WWNO and the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic for the fourth event in its series on “The Katrina Disaster Now”: a conversation about rising seas, sinking land, climate change, Louisiana, justice, and community – featuring leaders from diverse communities across the Louisiana coast in an event moderated by NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott.

89.9 WWNO — New Orleans Public Radio is launching an experimental new community-embedded reporting series, focused on the Louisiana criminal justice system. The station was one of 15 organizations chosen from over 200 entrants in a nationwide competition to incubate storytelling experiments and expand public media to more Americans.

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