Mallory Falk / WWNO


Our series "Closing Costs" follows three New Orleans schools who lost their charters.

At Lagniappe Academies, some administrators tried to hide a lack of services for students with disabilities. The state and Recovery School District chose to close the school, which is a cluster of mobile classrooms in Tremé, rather than find a new operator.

The last day starts off in the cafeteria. Students perform the school chants and cheers one last time.

Pop songs alternate with the chants. Students dance, some with carefully choreographed dance routines.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores how people handle childcare in New Orleans.



Since the debate over the noise ordinance came to a standstill last April, live music advocates and neighborhood groups are stuck with an unlikely piece of legislation to deal with sound in the city:  zoning.

It’s early evening on Frenchmen Street, and the doors of this bar are wide open. Tourists are drifting in and out, and the music is free. It’s also illegal.

The Ruston Farmer's Market marks the opening of it's eighth season Saturday.

The market welcomes growers from Lincoln Parish and across the region in providing fresh produce.  "We'll have fresh-to-Louisiana produce, local honey, fresh cut flowers, baked goods, and a number of regional goods," says market spokesperson Jean McWeeney.

Special children's activities are planned for opening day and North Central Louisiana Arts Council provides local art. 

Eve Abrams

Wetland Resources plants hurricane resistant trees to protect Louisiana’s coastline.

Demetra Kandalepas is a senior scientist at Wetland Resources. We’re on the way to visit their bald cypress and tupelo nursery. It’s in the middle of a marsh. We drive down a muddy path next to a huge, raised pipe.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

If you have young children or have friends with young children in New Orleans, chances are you know about the struggle to find quality daycare/after school care.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Every week in Old Mandeville, the gray stucco train depot comes alive for the Mandeville Trailhead Community Market. Sponsored by the city, it saw about 24,000 visitors last year and hosts about 60 vendors every Saturday.

The market is a place to buy local crafts, soap, honey, baked goods and plants. Plus, it provides many with companionship and community.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Edible Schoolyard New Orleans works to empower generations of New Orleans children to build and maintain healthy relationships with food, the natural world, themselves and their community.

Stefin Pasternak, is the lead chef educator at Samuel L Green Charter School, home of one of Edible Schoolyard’s two teaching kitchens, and one of their five school gardens. He directs two students to set the table for a communal meal.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

On Saturday, May 2 Orleans Parish residents will vote on whether to fund local public libraries through a property tax hike. It would raise around $8 million a year for the library system, for the next 25 years.

Eve Abrams

The YMCA of Greater New Orleans is taking steps to reduce the burden of diabetes by offering a Diabetes Prevention Program, so that people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes don’t.

When you think YMCA, what comes to mind?

Volleyball, helping kids, swimming, gymnastics, the gym, the song.