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Now that Marlene Kennedy finally has her own apartment, she doesn't have to worry where she'll sleep each night.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Louisiana is the incarceration capital of the world. But most people behind bars aren’t locked up forever. In fact, 90 percent of them will someday be released. So that makes Louisiana also the reentry capital of the world-- a role the state is ill-prepared for.

Rev. Jesse Jackson, Rev. Al Sharpton and local leaders at funeral for Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge.
Jason Saul / WWNO

WWNO is covering the funeral of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge. Events open to the public begin 8 a.m. Friday, July 15, with the funeral expected to begin at 11 a.m. Expected guests include Rev. Al Sharpton, Rev. Jesse Jackson, and U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-New Orleans). The proceedings are being held at the F.G. Clark Center on the campus of Southern University.

The Triple S Mart in Baton Rouge has become a shrine and a gathering place for activists. It's where Alton Sterling was shot and killed by police officers just over a week ago.

Standing in front of a large mural of Sterling at the convenience store, his son, 15-year-old Cameron Sterling said he hoped his father's death would help bring people in the city together.

"My father was a good man," Cameron said. "That was a sacrifice to show everybody what was going on."

Police responded to Baton Rouge street protests en masse on July 10.
Bryan Tarnowski

This story is being continuously updated.

Protests continued in Baton Rouge Sunday evening, six days after the shooting death of Alton Sterling by a Baton Rouge police officer.

Large crowds of protestors collected in several different areas of the city, met by police in riot gear. At least 50 people were arrested.

With reporting from Baton Rouge by Jesse Hardman, Tegan Wendland and Bryan Tarnowski.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

About 100 people marched along St. Claude Avenue in New Orleans on Sunday in protest of police shootings and street violence.  

The killing of Alton Sterling, 37, by police earlier this week touched off protests across the country – but in Sterling's home city of Baton Rouge, La., demonstrators' outrage has rarely exceeded a parboil. And that's by design.

Baton Rouge, La., gathered for the third night in a row to remember Alton Sterling.

Sterling was shot by police on Tuesday; video posted that night showed he was lying on the ground when police pulled their weapons. The local community quickly took to the streets in protest.

On Wednesday, as the story gained national traction, a second photo was posted online, showing the shooting from closer range. On Wednesday night, The Associated Press reports, people gathered in prayer and anger to remember Sterling and protest his death.

Calvin Manny Hills and his oldest sister, Johnnie Mae Hills Sylve, get together for a Father's Day party.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

In nearly every state, prison populations have exploded -- in large part, because of drug laws and the people, like Manny Hills, who are arrested and incarcerated for those laws. Over the last 25 years, Manny, an addict, has been convicted several times for drug possession and other petty crimes. His story is pretty typical of the people who fill up our nation's prisons.

When it comes to child well-being in the U.S., Louisiana ranks near the bottom: 48th. That's according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The results of the annual report are, sadly, not shocking. "We have historically always ranked at least in the bottom five states in overall child well-being, so unfortunately that wasn't a big surprise," says Teresa Falgoust. She's with Agenda for Children, which contributed local data to the national report. It looks at trends in data between 2008 and 2014.

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