Coastal Desk

Louisiana GOHSEP / Wikimedia Commons

Monday, June 8, 2015  marks the deadline to file a claim under the Deepwater Horizon Economic and Property Damages Settlement Program. The four Louisiana claims centers located in Cutoff, Lake Charles, Lafitte and Metairie will be open until midnight tonight.

Herman, Herman & Katz's Steve Herman, co-lead council for the BP trial's plaintiff's steering committee, explained what the deadline means, starting with the difference between this program and the seafood compensation program, for which the deadline to file claims has already passed.

A federal jury in New Orleans has found a former BP executive not guilty of lying to investigators about the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Eileen Fleming reports the criminal case centered on how much oil he said was gushing from BP’s blown out well.

Paul Floro / Army Corps of Engineers

The Army Corps of Engineers held a public meeting to discuss a new project that will add fabric matting and natural grasses to the top of the levees along the lakefront. The design aims to protect from surges caused by a 100-year storm.

The Corps refers to this project as "armoring" the levees. The existing system is defined to withstand a hurricane with a 1 percent chance of occurring any given year: a "100-year storm." This armoring strategy is being put in place in case there’s an even stronger storm that breaches those levees.

Ten years ago, the U.S. experienced its busiest hurricane season ever recorded. The year saw 28 named storms — 15 of them hurricanes — including Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast. Four major hurricanes hit the U.S. in 2005, beginning in July with Hurricane Dennis.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Making a home in Southeastern Louisiana has always meant risk of flooding. While some families in low lying coastal parishes elevated their homes in the 1990s, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita kicked off a boom of raising homes.

Now, more than 150 elevation companies operate in Orleans Parish alone, and have spent the past decade competing for billions of dollars in federal subsidies to help local homeowners elevate.   

Wikimedia Commons

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its Atlantic hurricane outlook during a news conference at City Hall on Wednesday. The report predicted a below-normal storm season. The 2015 forecast looks mild, but Mayor Mitch Landrieu reminded the crowd it only takes one major hurricane. And even though NOAA is generally on par with their predictions, "nobody can guarantee you what’s gonna happen," the mayor says.

Tim McLean

What happens when you put an artist and a scientist in the same boat? The local artist residency ‘A Studio In The Woods’ aimed to find out, with their new fellowship "Flint and Steel: Cross-disciplinary Combustion". It matches artists with Tulane University faculty to explore social and environmental change through art.

The New Orleans City Council just passed the first new Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance in 40 years. One part of the ordinance, Article 23, mandates a more “green” approach to water in the city — specifically, all the extra water we get from heavy rain and storms.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Who's still thinking about Christmas in spring? The New Orleans Department of Sanitation, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Guard. This generation-long partnership comes together for the annual Christmas tree drop. Christmas trees are picked up curbside after the new year, packaged into bundles, and dropped via helicopter into a local wetlands area to build back land mass. The National Guard uses it as a training exercise, and the nearby wildlife refuge Bayou Sauvage gets a coastal restoration project.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

It's been five years since the 2010 BP oil spill. On the day of the actual anniversary, a march and rally took place in the Central Business District to commemorate the people and places impacted by the spill. Marchers went from Lafayette Square to Jackson Square, dressed in all black to represent the 210 million gallons of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico.

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