clean water act

A federal rule that revises which bodies of water are subject to the Clean Water Act will take effect Aug. 28. Some Louisiana farmers are concerned that the new Clean Water Rule is overreaching.

The biggest change is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is defining ditches, according to LSU Ag Center water policy economist Naveen Adusumilli. Any ditch that is part of a tributary or connected to a previously jurisdictional waterway would now have to be in compliance with the Clean Water Act.

The U.S. Treasury Department has set out 97 pages of rules for investing and allocating money that BP PLC and other defendants will pay in Clean Water Act fines for the Gulf of Mexico oil spill of 2010.

The rules released yesterday formally set up a trust fund for money that state and local governments will get under the RESTORE Act and procedures for getting that money.

The total is expected to be billions of dollars, but nobody knows what it will be.

U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier has scheduled the third of three trials on the question in January.

Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu is applauding the Senate’s passage of the Restore Act, which designates 80 percent of Clean Water Act fines from the BP oil spill to the five Gulf states.

There’s been a delay in the federal trial to determine damages from the BP oil spill. Judge Carl Barbier is giving parties another week for settlement negotiations to continue.