civil rights

American Routes Shortcuts: Mavis Staples

Jul 28, 2017
Mavis Staples
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek of the upcoming show. This week, it’s the second installment of our program all about Bob Dylan.  Here’s host Nick Spitzer with Mavis Staples, on American Routes.

NS: Bob Dylan admired the civil rights songs of the Staples singers,  and would hear them on tour in the early 60s. Mavis Staples remembers when her father, Pops, heard Dylan for the first time, and how Dylan’s protest lyrics influenced their family in return.

Eyes on the Prize: Movement Moments from a Civil Rights Activist

Mar 30, 2017
The Historic New Orleans Collection

The March on Washington, the bus boycotts, and sit-ins across the country: these are all images of the civil rights movement that we may familiar with. What may be less obvious are the turning points that pushed individuals to join the struggle. William Rouselle's career spans decades of activism, from his groundbreaking work as a television reporter to his cultural organizing with the Free Southern Theater.

Bobby Grier speaks with representatives from the Sugar Bowl in 1956.
The University of Pittsburgh / The University of Pittsburgh

Bobby Grier was the first African-American to play in the Sugar Bowl. As a member of the Pittsburgh Panthers, Grier played against Georgia Tech on January 2, 1956 — only months after Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi and weeks after Rosa Parks was arrested in Alabama.

Perhaps as expected, his participation was met with opposition: the governor of Georgia insisted that Georgia Tech boycott the Sugar Bowl that year. But the game was played, Grier was its leading rusher, and the Civil Rights Movement continued to gain momentum.

President George W. Bush visits the restored Dooky Chase Restaurant in 2008 with Leah Chase, left, and Dooky Chase, right.
Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Edgar "Dooky" Chase, Jr., the patriarch of the Chase family who passed away at the end of 2016, helped in making Dooky Chase’s Restaurant the landmark establishment it is today. Here, his wife of 70 years, Chef Leah Chase, shares memories of her husband, his life as a musician and the quiet role he played behind the scenes in the Civil Rights movement.


On the grounds of Whitney Plantation. Former slave quarters are on the right with Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall visible in the background.
Sarah Holtz

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate the 151st anniversary of Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

A New Orleans civil rights law firm has put the Caddo Parish District Attorney's Office on notice of a possible lawsuit over allegations it excludes black people from juries based on race.

The MacArthur Justice Center released a copy of a letter Monday it sent to Caddo Parish Acting District Attorney Dale Cox, demanding his office preserve documents that might be used as evidence in such a suit, according to MacArthur Justice Center co-director Jim Craig.

Former New Orleans civil rights activist Rudy Lombard has died.

He was 75.

The one-time mayoral candidate’s conviction for a sit-in at a Canal Street store was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court.

He died Saturday of complications from pancreatic cancer.

The New Orleans Advocate reports Lombard spent the past 20 years or so in Evanston, Illinois, where he worked as a research scientist for NorthShore University HealthSystem, focusing on prostate cancer. He was diagnosed with the disease a decade ago.

Civil Rights Complaints Target New Orleans Charter Schools

May 13, 2014
frwl / Wikimedia

A coalition of groups opposed to charter schools says it is filing federal civil rights complaints claiming discrimination by officials running school systems in New Orleans, Chicago and Newark, New Jersey.

Copies of the complaints were released today by the Journey for Justice Alliance. They say black students in the three cities suffer because of the closure of traditional public schools or the conversion of them into charter schools — run by independent organizations under charters approved by state or local education officials.

Eric E Castro / Flickr

This story has been updated.

A group of lawyers, students and parents have filed a civil rights complaint against three local charter schools. They're asking state and federal officials to investigate the discipline policies at Carver Preparatory, Carver Collegiate Academy and Sci Academy, all operated by Collegiate Academies. These schools have the highest suspension rates in the city.

Wiki Commons

On Friday NOCCA, the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, celebrates with music, guest speakers, a second line and more. The occasion? Plessy Day.

That name should bring to mind history class, and the landmark 1890s Supreme Court case Plessy versus Ferguson, in which the court upheld racial segregation and "separate but equal" as a legal standard.

Pages