cemeteries

Latest News
7:19 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Historic Cemetery To Restrict Tours Because Of Vandalism

A historic New Orleans cemetery will soon be off-limits to tourists on their own because of repeated tomb vandalism.

Starting in March, entry to St. Louis Cemetery Number One will be restricted to relatives of those buried there. Others must be accompanied by a tour guide registered with the Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans, which owns the property.

That cemetery may have started the city's tradition of above-ground crypts

In late 2012, someone covered the reputed tomb of voodoo priestess Marie Laveau with pink paint.

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Latest News
5:41 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Refurbished Tomb Of Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau To Be Unveiled On Halloween

Before getting a new look, the tomb of Marie Laveau in St Louis Cemetery No. 1 was a target for vandals.
Anthony Fine Flickr

The final resting place of New Orleans Voodoo queen Marie Laveau has been restored to its original state. The refinished tomb in Cemetery No. 1 will be unveiled this Friday, on Halloween.

According to NOLA.com, Bayou Preservation was hired in August by the Archdiocese of New Orleans and Save Our Cemeteries to return the monument to its 200-year-old original state. The restoration cost $10,000.

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Features
3:44 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

In La., Families Still Searching For Storm-Scattered Remains

Lionel Alverez stands at a family tomb in Plaquemines Parish, La. Hurricane Isaac's storm surge split the double-decker tomb in half, leaving his aunt's and sister's caskets on the bottom but washing away his mother's, which was on top.
Keith O'Brien for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 7:23 pm

Lionel Alverez is in the Promised Land Cemetery again, taking inventory. He has been coming to this cemetery in Plaquemines Parish, La., all his life. The graveyard is hemmed in between the Mississippi River and the marsh on a lonely stretch of highway.

Promised Land has been the final resting place for the Alverezes for generations. Alverez, 61, points out several graves, one by one. "Albert Alverez. Huey Alverez and Harold Alverez. My brother Allen is near the rear, back there."

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