business

This week on Out to Lunch.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Many of our greatest artists liked cocktails. Degas, Van Gogh, Manet, and many others spoke glowingly of the effect of alcohol on their work, and painted bottles, glasses, and folks drinking.

Peter entertains two of New Orleans' most innovative creative entrepreneurs on this Out to Lunch from Commander's Palace.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Louisiana’s governor, John Bel Edwards, was in Washington DC last week lobbying Congress to approve a disaster aid package of nearly $3 billion to help with flood relief. Part of that would go to help small businesses recover. In addition to more than 140,000 homes, nearly 7,000 businesses were flooded-out.

Eve Troeh

This week on All Things New Orleans, we get into Cajun country rice fields with Tegan Wendland, for an update on ruined crops after the 2016 Louisiana floods. Public policy lawyer Jeffrey Thomas has made disaster a bigger part of his work after the levee failures of Katrina. He talks about the road ahead for long-term recovery and using federal funds to help flooded communities.

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

For a long time in New Orleans, if you wanted to eat healthy, you could eat at home. Although that sounds like a joke, it was pretty close to the truth. If you were eating out and wanted a salad, you’d be lucky to find anything other than a pedestrian appetizer.

Today, things are looking brighter for the healthy eater.

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

According to government statistics, about 30 million Americans are under 5 years old. That’s a big market. But even in today’s generation of accelerated development, it takes a while before kids want to buy stuff. But little kids sure like to do stuff.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch have businesses whose clients are little kids who like to do stuff. Stuff like big kids do. Or even adults.

Co-founder of ReDrive, Max Burwick, joins Peter Ricchiuti on this edition of Out to Lunch.
Alison Moon / WWNO

When was the last time you bought a car? After you bought it, if it was new, did you think you could have gotten a better deal? If it was used, did you notice something a few days later that you’d wished you’d seen before you bought it?

The Economy of Crime on this week's Out to Lunch with Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

On Out to Lunch, Peter Ricchiuti leads a frank conversation about the business approach to solving New Orleans’ issues with crime. He's joined by Sidney Torres, IV and Aimee Adatto Freeman.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

A lot of tourists who come to New Orleans go home and describe the city as an oasis of European-looking streets lined with music clubs where people wander around drinking cocktails and eating beignets 24 hours a day. This fabulous wonderland is the same 13 riverside blocks that locals describe as dirty, smelly, crime-ridden, home to gutter punks, T-shirt shops, and over-priced restaurants they wouldn’t go to even if they could find a parking place.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

According to the reputable Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation, right around twenty percent of the population of the United States is under 15. That’s a sizeable market. You don’t have to look very far to see the marketers of stuff that kids like trying to sell it to them. Mostly food and toys. Which demonstrates that we don’t change all that much as we grow older.

Chicken and beer on this week's edition of Out to Lunch.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you had to name the biggest fried chicken business in Louisiana, you probably wouldn’t have to think about it too long. You might take a bit longer to name the next biggest. And even then you might not come up with Krispy Krunchy. Krispy Krunchy’s executive Vice President Dan Shapiro is Peter's guest on this edition of Out to Lunch.

What’s fried chicken without a beer? Peter's other guest on today’s show is Michael Naquin, founder of 40 Arpent Brewing Company.

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