Army Corps of Engineers

The St. Claude Street Bridge raises as a barge passes beneath it.
Thomas Walsh / WWNO

Southeastern Louisiana relies on federal funds to keep it a viable place to live. That means constant construction; roads, levees, and the latest project, a $951 million dollar plan to widen the Industrial Canal. The Army Corps of Engineers has reached out to the surrounding communities for input and the proposal is wildly unpopular. The Listening Post wanted to hear both sides of the debate. 

The Listening Post asked:

1) What kind of input should communities have on federal projects like these?

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The US Army Corps of Engineers has a new commander of the New Orleans District. 

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As hurricane season approaches, the Army Corps of Engineers is making sure area pumping stations are operating properly. The system is working as planned.

Tobin Fricke

Governor Bobby Jindal has issued a state of emergency as the Mississippi River rises due to floodwater making its way south after heavy rain the Midwest.

The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a new way to measure the value of wetlands and restore those destroyed by industry.

The proposed Louisiana Wetlands Rapid Assessment Method, or LRAM, is a compensatory wetland mitigation method that will help them evaluate different types of wetlands, like bottomland hardwoods or cypress swamp, and determine how to offset destruction caused by development.

If a company wants to build in the wetlands it has to replace what is destroyed.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Ten years after Katrina, the Army Corps of Engineers says it is ready for the next big one. The Corps has built new levees, floodwalls and gated structures over the past decade to protect the city and its people.

Paul Floro / Army Corps of Engineers

The Army Corps of Engineers held a public meeting to discuss a new project that will add fabric matting and natural grasses to the top of the levees along the lakefront. The design aims to protect from surges caused by a 100-year storm.

The Corps refers to this project as "armoring" the levees. The existing system is defined to withstand a hurricane with a 1 percent chance of occurring any given year: a "100-year storm." This armoring strategy is being put in place in case there’s an even stronger storm that breaches those levees.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is allocating $2.4 million on top of congressional spending this year for dredging the Red River. The J. Bennett Johnston Waterway Navigation Project received the additional funds for operation and maintenance. The head of the Red River Waterway Commission, Ken Guidry, says the funding is critical to keep industries based at the Port of Caddo-Bossier and the Alexandria Port.

Pentagon Announces Levee Armoring Contracts

Dec 16, 2014

The Pentagon says three Louisiana companies have contracts worth up to $200 million in total to armor levees in the New Orleans area.

The Pentagon says Bis Services of Kenner, Circle of Belle Chasse, and Shavers-Whittle Construction of Mandeville, were among 10 companies that bid over the Internet.

Their contracts are with the Army Corps of Engineers in New Orleans. They were on a list of contracts released last night by the Pentagon.

The work is to be done by December 2020. The amount paid for each job will be decided individually.

State Sues Corps Of Engineers Over MRGO

Oct 29, 2014

Louisiana coastal restoration officials are suing a federal agency over the cost of fixing damage blamed on a now-closed south Louisiana waterway.

The federal court lawsuit was filed Tuesday in New Orleans by the Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority. It notes that the man-made Mississippi River Gulf Outlet is widely blamed for contributing to flooding during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. It says federal law ordering the closure of the channel also requires the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to restore wetlands damaged by years of poor maintenance of the waterway.

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