Army Corps of Engineers

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carre Spillway to a big crowd Thursday morning, in order to relieve pressure on Mississippi River levees downstream.

 

The Army Corps estimates 500-600 people showed up to watch the Corps open the Spillway. Katie Huffaker drove all the way from Houma. She homeschools her kids and thought it would make for a good lesson in geography.  

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers will open the Bonnet Carré Spillway on Thursday to prevent river flooding near New Orleans.

 

The Mississippi River is rising, as floodwater from the Midwest makes its way south.

Travis Lux / WWNO

More than 20,000 scientists from around the world came to New Orleans this week for the American Geophysical Union conference. From minerals and volcanoes to oceans, space, and climate change -- they presented all kinds of research.

 

Sara Sneath from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune was there. So was WWNO’s Travis Lux. This week on the Coastal News Roundup, they met up at the conference to talk about the latest in coastal research.

The St. Claude Street Bridge raises as a barge passes beneath it.
Thomas Walsh / WWNO

Southeastern Louisiana relies on federal funds to keep it a viable place to live. That means constant construction; roads, levees, and the latest project, a $951 million dollar plan to widen the Industrial Canal. The Army Corps of Engineers has reached out to the surrounding communities for input and the proposal is wildly unpopular. The Listening Post wanted to hear both sides of the debate. 

The Listening Post asked:

1) What kind of input should communities have on federal projects like these?

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The US Army Corps of Engineers has a new commander of the New Orleans District. 

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As hurricane season approaches, the Army Corps of Engineers is making sure area pumping stations are operating properly. The system is working as planned.

Tobin Fricke

Governor Bobby Jindal has issued a state of emergency as the Mississippi River rises due to floodwater making its way south after heavy rain the Midwest.

The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a new way to measure the value of wetlands and restore those destroyed by industry.

The proposed Louisiana Wetlands Rapid Assessment Method, or LRAM, is a compensatory wetland mitigation method that will help them evaluate different types of wetlands, like bottomland hardwoods or cypress swamp, and determine how to offset destruction caused by development.

If a company wants to build in the wetlands it has to replace what is destroyed.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Ten years after Katrina, the Army Corps of Engineers says it is ready for the next big one. The Corps has built new levees, floodwalls and gated structures over the past decade to protect the city and its people.

Paul Floro / Army Corps of Engineers

The Army Corps of Engineers held a public meeting to discuss a new project that will add fabric matting and natural grasses to the top of the levees along the lakefront. The design aims to protect from surges caused by a 100-year storm.

The Corps refers to this project as "armoring" the levees. The existing system is defined to withstand a hurricane with a 1 percent chance of occurring any given year: a "100-year storm." This armoring strategy is being put in place in case there’s an even stronger storm that breaches those levees.

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