Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

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1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

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Ian McNulty

For Antoine’s Restaurant, the oldest restaurant in New Orleans, 2015 marks its 175th birthday. And, naturally, events and promotions will unfold through the year tied to its long history and deep well of tradition. But, even as it celebrates its past, Antoine’s is also using this anniversary to introduce changes that are aimed squarely at the future, and even at its very survival.

Ian McNulty

Picture some friends sharing and sampling a progression of small plates and you have a very modern portrait of casual dining. But, in another example of how new trends at the dinner table often reflect old customs, you can assemble that same scene around Turkish flavors and see a very traditional view of social dining. That’s one on display in New Orleans these days at an Uptown eatery called Mezze.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

For players and coaches, a football game starts long before kickoff. The same holds true for the food-minded Saints fan. For such fans, it starts with choosing what to cook and devoting the hands-on work to ensure a victorious feast.

It's really no wonder. Take the enthusiasm of the Who Dat Nation, add south Louisiana's endemic passion for food and the results are predictably over the top.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

The Japanese restaurant that introduced many in New Orleans to sushi now is showing a different approach that goes far beyond the familiar rolls.

Ian McNulty

Chefs and restaurateurs are increasingly joining efforts to promote sustainable Gulf seafood for reasons that unite the economy, the ecology and regional culture.  

Ian McNulty

A new market-within-a-market seems right in step with the renewed appreciation for locally harvested or handmade food and the burgeoning cottage industry producing it all.

Head down to the French Market early on a Wednesday afternoon these days and you can watch as about two dozen vendors set up booths for a new weekly edition of the Crescent City Farmers Market. These vendors come from all across the region, as reflected by what they’re bringing to market these days.

Ian McNulty

A new food truck park offering an offbeat supper option and a glimpse of what’s in store for St. Claude Avenue.

It’s easy to portray food trucks as the renegades of the culinary world. Modern, highly mobile and very much in vogue, they play by different rules than brick-and-mortar restaurants. But around New Orleans lately, these food trucks are increasingly enlisted to serve a number of community causes alongside their street food.

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