Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

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Ways to Connect

Ian McNulty

Just where is “local?” In the food world these days, the answer is everywhere.

Local is emblazoned on your grocery store ad and woven across your restaurant menu. It’s at the core of the growing network of farmers markets, and local is fueling the explosion of new cottage industry producers and specialty suppliers. Local food is big, and around New Orleans it’s booming.

When it comes to the question what is local, however, the answer is changing, and in some very interesting ways. This month in particular is a good time to catch up on what’s new.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

Tracing the roots of a widespread network of New Orleans restaurateurs back to one Greek island and one shared American story.

“Opa!” that’s the universal Greek exclamation of joy, and you’ll be hearing it a lot this weekend as the Greek Festival returns to the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Lakeview. But for some of those sharing in the opa spirit, the toast is about more than just the revelry of the moment.

Ian McNulty

You can chalk up the fiery burn of some dishes at Red’s Chinese to potent chiles. And that fleeting tingle across your tongue? That’s the work of Szechuan peppercorns. But what really gets the blood pulsing at this new Bywater restaurant goes beyond individual ingredients, and gets to something on the rise for restaurants around New Orleans.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty


SoFAB Institute

Some museums offer a chance to connect with the highest achievements of art and ingenuity, to gaze over priceless wonders or to better understand pivotal moments of human history.

At the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, some of what resonates most richly may be artifacts you once had in your pantry or old brand names whose jingles are still stuck in your head.

You’re less likely to swoon over some rarified treasure as to delight in the recognition of something tied up with your own traditions and ties to the region’s food culture.  

Ian McNulty

Think New Orleans needs more street food? This weekend's French Quarter Festival is teeming with inspiration for new ideas.

Street food is a term that has a lot of cachet in the dining world these days. I just wish we could get our hands on it a little more.

Ian McNulty

Mention Mexican food and many people think they already know the score. They start picturing tacos and burritos, chips and salsa, gobs of sour cream and rivers of melted cheddar. These are the touchstones of Tex-Mex cooking. That’s what many of us were raised on when it came to Mexican food. And, for the record, I love that stuff still.

But consider how the differences stacked up during a meal at Del Fuego Taqueria, a Uptown eatery that is part of a wave of new Mexican restaurants arriving in New Orleans.

Paul Cheney

A spirit of competition and creative excess is helping a local charity cook-off grow bigger and better, and in ways beyond the food offerings.

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