Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

Subscribe to Where Y'Eat as a podcast:

1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Ways to Connect

A Louisiana crawfish boil is a hands-on affair. Keep those cell phones in your pocket.
Ian McNulty

Crawfish give us so much. Good flavor, an excuse to gather, a chance to bask in the seasonal food glories of south Louisiana. Well, I’m adding one more blessing to the pile – a crawfish boil creates a temporary sanctuary from the cell phone.

Creole gumbo from Cafe Dauphine in New Orleans. Gumbo in its many varities satisfies more than just a hunger in Louisiana.
Ian McNulty

If you love New Orleans food thank a New Orleans mother. If you’re really lucky that will be your own mother, or maybe, like me, your mother-in-law. But it doesn’t even matter if you’re related.

Arthur "Mr. Okra" Robinson was a beloved produce vendor in New Orleans. He died Feb. 15, 2018 at age 74.
Ian McNulty

New Orleans lost a legend this year with the death of Arthur Robinson, the roving produce vendor beloved across the city and known to all as Mr Okra.

After Jazz Fest, the neighborhood fills with people, sounds and more food.
Ian McNulty

Everyone knows you should go to Jazz Fest ready to eat. But no one says you have to show up starving. And on the way back out, I’ve found it’s smart to have a little room left in the tank too, to be ready for those opportune eats on the streets.

Crawfish coated with butter and garlic from Big EZ Seafood in Gretna.
Ian McNulty

It starts with spicy boiled crawfish, the pride of Louisiana, but it was born elsewhere.

Served in huge, help-yourself piles, the crawfish boil can seem engineered for social interaction.
Ian McNulty

Crawfish season is finally rolling for real, and so the food conversation turns to the endless variations on seasoning, timing, technique, process and produce that goes into the pot.

Ribs off the smoker for a backyard barbcue.
Ian McNulty

There's more barbecue around New Orleans these days. But it's not just a case of more barbecue restaurants, and that's where things get interesting. Roll up your sleeves New Orleans, it looks like our town is finally building its own barbecue culture.

Red beans and rice at Dunbar's Creole Cuisine in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Gumbo is famous. Po-boys get plenty of press and king cake is now a seasonal sensation, splayed across social media for all the hungry world to crave.

The Lenten fish fry is a sign of the season in south Louisiana that brings more than flavor to the table.
Ian McNulty

Sometimes, the food seasons of New Orleans arrive in all the gaudy glory of a king cake, and sometimes they register as the roiling boil of crawfish revving up in the backyard.

A specially cultivated oyster from the waters around Grand Isle.
Ian McNulty

If we're at an oyster bar in Louisiana, we are usually not after something new, unless maybe it’s some different mojo in the cocktail sauce. But the oyster? We already know exactly what to expect. It will be a Gulf oyster – big, gregarious, generous, delicious, a bargain too and a taste we know by heart.

Pages