TriPod: New Orleans At 300

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is WWNO’s FRESH radio history of New Orleans, released in weekly segments as our city approaches its Tricentennial in 2018. Each TriPod segment is its own micro-documentary, devoted to a single story or subject from New Orleans’ rich history. The series explores lost and neglected stories, delves deeper into the familiar, and questions what we think we know about the city’s history.

Why “TriPod”? “Tri” for the city’s three centuries, “Pod” for podcast, and “tripod”, a three-legged tool used to steady a capturing device that documents a time and place. TriPod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city’s past, and to enrich understanding of its present and future.

TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at the University of New Orleans. The series is hosted and produced by WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson, working with the assistance of a forty-member international advisory group of historians and archivists.

TriPod airs Thursdays during Morning Edition at 8:30 a.m. on 89.9 FM, repeats on Mondays during All Things Considered, and is available anytime on WWNO.org and as a podcast on iTunes.

Click to meet the TriPod Editorial Board and Advisory Group.  

Click here to open TriPod in iTunes.

Click here to open TriPod in Stitcher.

Subscribe using another podcast player:

- Open your player

- Find the “Subscribe to Podcast” option

- Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/88432/rss.xml

Ways to Connect

The Charles L. Franck Studio Collection / The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a retrospective look at Mardi Gras, and the year that carnival took place in the dark. Hear the TriPod Xtras extended interview with Rien Fertel. 

Right now, you might not be itching for Mardi Gras, since it just happened and everything, but imagine what it will feel like six months from now when you haven’t caught any beads, or a shoe, or a light up clicky thing, and still have another six months to go. It can be rough.

The Charles L. Franck Studio Collection / The Historic New Orleans Collection

Tripod Xtras feature one on one interviews with special guests. This week’s TriPod episode focuses on Mardi Gras 1946 and the strike of the flambeaux carriers that left the major parades rolling with little to no light at all. This is an extended interview with Rien Fertel, writer, teacher, and historian from Louisiana. Rien just

Sandra Green Thomas

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history, and an attempt at reconciliation. Listen to Part I here

We left off at the Sold South Panel that took place in New Orleans in December of 2016. The discussion centered around something Georgetown University did in 1838 when the institution sold 272 enslaved people to two plantations in Louisiana to avoid bankruptcy.

Georgetown University

TriPod: New Orleans @300 returns with the first in a two-part series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history. In 1838, Jesuits from Georgetown University sold 272 people to Louisiana. Listen to Part II here.

Immigration buildings at what was 'Camp Algiers' circa 1916.
THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION, GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. PETER BERNARD, ACC. NO. 1984.112.228 / HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

Tripod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part II of its series on Camp Algiers, an internment camp that detained Latin Americans during World War II. Listen to Part I here.

Quarantine Station in Algiers La.
The Historic New Orleans Collection, acc. no. 1995.19 / Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part I of a two-part series about a World War II era internment camp in Algiers that held those suspicious of affiliations with axis powers. Listen to Part II here

Al Ledner outside of the Cointreau home he designed out on Park Island in New Orleans.
Roy Beeson

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 brings us another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with 92 year old Architect Al Ledner. Ledner graduated from the Tulane School of Architecture, and briefly left his hometown of New Orleans to study with Frank Lloyd Wright. He has buildings all around the country, and is known in New Orleans for the homes he built on Park Island in Bayou St. John, including the Cointreau home.

The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mrs. Joy Segura, acc. no. 2004.0096.68

This is to a special edition of TriPod New Orleans @300. Producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson handed the mic over to the New Orleans Scholars, a group of students from Metairie Park Country Day and Benjamin Franklin High Schools. Each semester they collaborate with a community group to explore a local challenge: economic, environmental, political and historical.

Photograph of Mother Catherine and her congregation at the Temple of the Innocent Blood, ca. 1929.
Historic New Orleans Collection, made possible by the Clarisse Claiborne Grima Fund.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a portrait of Mother Catherine Seals, one of the city’s most prominent 20th century spiritual church leaders.

Mother Catherine Seals is a mysterious figure. There’s not much written about her, and there are only a few photographs of her. So a lot of what we do know about this spiritual mother is hearsay.

The entrance to the Sisters of The Holy Family Motherhouse on Chef Menteur Highway in New Orleans East
Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with a story of The Sisters of the Holy Family, the religious order of nuns for free women of color founded by Henriette Delille before the Civil War. They’re still ministering today.

Driving along Chef Menteur Highway out in New Orleans East, you pass your fair share of fast food joints, RV parks, and Super 8 motels. And then, a huge Nativity scene on a big mid-century building. It’s the motherhouse of the Sisters of the Holy Family.

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