TriPod: New Orleans At 300

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is WWNO’s FRESH radio history of New Orleans, released in weekly segments as our city approaches its Tricentennial in 2018. Each TriPod segment is its own micro-documentary, devoted to a single story or subject from New Orleans’ rich history. The series explores lost and neglected stories, delves deeper into the familiar, and questions what we think we know about the city’s history.

Why “TriPod”? “Tri” for the city’s three centuries, “Pod” for podcast, and “tripod”, a three-legged tool used to steady a capturing device that documents a time and place. TriPod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city’s past, and to enrich understanding of its present and future.

TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at the University of New Orleans. The series is hosted and produced by WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson, working with the assistance of a forty-member international advisory group of historians and archivists.

TriPod airs Thursdays during Morning Edition at 8:30 a.m. on 89.9 FM, repeats on Mondays during All Things Considered, and is available anytime on WWNO.org and as a podcast on iTunes.

Click to meet the TriPod Editorial Board and Advisory Group.  

Click here to open TriPod in iTunes.

Click here to open TriPod in Stitcher.

Subscribe using another podcast player:

- Open your player

- Find the “Subscribe to Podcast” option

- Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/88432/rss.xml

Ways to Connect

John Wisdom

You’ve probably heard of the James Beard Awarding-winning Duong Phuong Bakery out in New Orleans East, whether or not you actually got to taste their coveted King Cake. But today, high school students from Metairie Park Country Day take over TriPod to go beyond Duong Phong, and explore the larger Vietnamese community in the East.

Not long after we celebrated New Years Eve 2018, an entire community in New Orleans East celebrated their new years eve. It’s called Tet.

Herb Roe / wikimedia commons

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new tripod xtra. Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with John Barbry of the Tunica Biloxi nation, to discuss the history of the tribe and its contributions to New Orleans and Louisiana. The Tunica Biloxi land is in Marksville, Louisiana, about three hours outside New Orleans. The  conversation begins when the Tunica Biloxi made contact Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto.

Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode about a Mexican band that rocked the city in the 80s -- the 1880s. 

Long, long ago, a band in New Orleans swept the city off its feet, but it wasn’t a New Orleans Band. It was Mexican.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a tripod Xtra produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. In this tripod xtra, we hear an abridged talk given by Dr. Erin Greenwald, curator of the Historic New Orleans Collection's 'The Founding Era' exhibit. Greenwald traces New Orleans' African roots -- from their kidnapping in Africa, through the middle passage, to the seminal role Africans played in the founding of our city.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod put out an episode on the legendary Lastie family — a family that holds generations of iconic musicians. I talked to drummers and first cousins Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie about their experience growing up in this musical family, what it was like to hear Professor Longhair and Dr John play in their living room, what it was like to have their introduce drums into the spiritual church, and what it was like to get yelled at by that same grandfather when they tried to play James Brown in that same spiritual church.

Photograph by Michael P. Smith / ©The Historic New Orleans Collection

Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode that spotlights a famous musical family, the Lasties. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with drummers, and cousins, Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie. This is the first in a series of episodes focusing on the rich history of New Orleans music. Listen to the full interview with Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie here

Joshua Brasted

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod xtra segment. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with Chris Kaminstein and Kiyoko Mccray, co-directors of a new play called 'The Stranger Disease' by local theater group Goat In the Road. The three met at the historic Madame John's Legacy home in the French Quarter, where the performance takes place. Laine begins the conversation by asking Chris Kaminstein to explain the play's title.

Janet Wilson / WWNO

Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with political commentator and New Orleans native Cokie Roberts. The two discussed everything from the Me Too Movement to the 2018 midterm elections, and started local, with the city's upcoming mayoral transition.

This evening (Thursday) kicks off the tricentennial symposium ‘Making New Orleans Home.’ Organized by The Historic New Orleans Collection and the City, the event highlights 300 years of New Orleans history. Cokie Roberts is the keynote speaker. Roberts is a political commentator and a native New Orleanian - who now lives in the DC area. She says the tricentennial’s a big deal, and even though people up north might not care about the tricentennial, "they care about New Orleans.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a look at the once secret history of Gay  Carnival Krewes.  Note: this episode contains a racially insensitive word that may offend some listeners. We have included it for context.

Barrett Delong Church is showing me a giant flamingo Mardi Gras float that his husband will be riding on in the Krewe of Armenius den. Armenius is an all male, gay krewe, and it celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. I met Barrett, this year’s krewe captain, at their den the day before their big ball. This year’s theme?

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