TriPod: New Orleans At 300

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is WWNO’s FRESH radio history of New Orleans, released in weekly segments as our city approaches its Tricentennial in 2018. Each TriPod segment is its own micro-documentary, devoted to a single story or subject from New Orleans’ rich history. The series explores lost and neglected stories, delves deeper into the familiar, and questions what we think we know about the city’s history.

Why “TriPod”? “Tri” for the city’s three centuries, “Pod” for podcast, and “tripod”, a three-legged tool used to steady a capturing device that documents a time and place. TriPod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city’s past, and to enrich understanding of its present and future.

TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at the University of New Orleans. The series is hosted and produced by WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson, working with the assistance of a forty-member international advisory group of historians and archivists.

TriPod airs Thursdays during Morning Edition at 8:30 a.m. on 89.9 FM, repeats on Mondays during All Things Considered, and is available anytime on WWNO.org and as a podcast on iTunes.

Click to meet the TriPod Editorial Board and Advisory Group.  

Click here to open TriPod in iTunes.

Click here to open TriPod in Stitcher.

Subscribe using another podcast player:

- Open your player

- Find the “Subscribe to Podcast” option

- Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/88432/rss.xml

Ways to Connect

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment, where host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sits down with a special guest for a one on one conversation. This week, Laine spoke with Isabel Wilkerson, author of “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” while she was in town to give a talk at TEDWomen. This historical work studies the movement of African Americans who left the south for the North, Midwest, and Western parts of the United States, between 1915 and 1970.

Wynne Muscatine Graham

WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 launches its third season with this special on the relationship between New Orleans and Haiti. Listen to the hour long documentary here:

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with an hour-long special that explores two places linked in history. called “Haiti and New Orleans: Is the Feeling Mutual?”

Tune in Friday October 27 at 1pm  or Wednesday November 1 at 7pm

Once there was a slave uprising so epic, it led Napoleon to sell Louisiana to the United States, and brought thousands of refugees to New Orleans, doubling the city's population in just a few months.  The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), the only successful slave rebellion in the Americas, had a dramatic and lasting effect on New Orleans and North America.  Today many New Orleanians, black and white, trace their ancestral roots to Haiti.  The Caribbean nation remains an important part of the story New Orleans tell about itself.  But is New Orleans a part of Haitian history?  Is the feeling mutual?  TriPod sent producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson to find out.

Wynne Muscatine Graham / WWNO

WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns next week. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson traveled to Haiti this past summer and will launch the third season on Oct. 27, with an hour-long special about the relationship between Haiti and New Orleans. This documentary is called, "Haiti And New Orleans: Is The Feeling Mutual?" WWNO's Janae Pierre sat down with Laine to get a sneak peek of this TriPod special.

Andre Paultre

In this edition of TriPod Xtras, host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sits down with WWNO’s Janae Pierre to talk about a recent trip to Haiti, the end of TriPod’s second season, and a look at season three. To see photos from Laine’s reporting trip to Haiti, follow TriPod on Instagram at @TriPodnola. You can also tweet your favorite episodes at @tripodnola, and we’ll re-air them this summer, and give you a special shoutout! New TriPod xtras will be released between season 2 and season 3, but on the podcast only, so make sure you subscribe to the TriPod podcast wherever you get your podcasts. 

Mathew Brady Studio / National Archive

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a story about a monument that was supposed to be erected in the late 1800s, but never happened.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Dartmouth history professor Rashauna Johnson have talked before for the show. This time, their conversation was taped live during the 2017 Organization of American Historians conference that took place earlier this year. The two discussed Johnson’s first book, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions, which won the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history.

Pat Denton Collection, Newcomb Archives Tulane.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part II of its series on the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part I here.

Pat Denton Collection / Newcomb Archives, Tulane University

This is the first in a two-part series on the local Second-wave feminist movement and the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part II here. 

It’s July 3rd, 1982. Feminists are marching through downtown New Orleans in support of the Equal Rights Amendment, the ERA.

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

This is another edition of TriPod Xtras. We’ve cut together some highlights from a really interesting panel we went to a little while back, put on by the Broadmoor Improvement Association and held at Propeller. This event was right up our alley, because it was like a mashup of oral history and community engagement, and gave space for elders to share their experiences alongside folks that are doing work today.

Pages