Musica da Camera's Continuum

Sundays at 6 a.m.
  • Hosted by Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien

The first Continuum broadcast was in February, 1976, and was hosted by Milton Scheuermann. Thais St. Julien joined him on the second, and the two have continued to co-host the weekly program ever since. During the past 40 years, they’ve produced over 1900 programs! Continuum has been a winner of the Early Music America/Millennium of Music National Radio Competition, and received the KXMS Fine Arts Radio International Award (Classical Radio Programing with Educational Content).

In addition to presenting a variety of recorded music of the middle ages, Renaissance and Baroque from the Musica da Camera’s 4,000 CD collection, the co-hosts have interviewed a number of internationally known performers, including John Reeves White (director of the New York Pro Musica) David Munrow (director of the Early Music Consort of London), Anonymous 4, and members of the Boston Camerata, and Sequentia. The program has also featured recordings of live early music concerts of both Musica da Camera and guest artists.

The 1928 silent movie film, “The Passion of Joan of Arc”, greatly inspired American composer Richard Einhorn to write his monumental oratorio, “Voices of Light” in 1994. This Continuum presents a recording of a major portion of that work performed by Anonymous 4, other vocal and instrumental soloists with the Netherlands Radio Choir and Radio Philharmonic. Recordings used are: Voices of Light (Anonymous 4 et al) - Sony Classical SK 62006, and A l’Estampida (Dufay Collective) - Continuum CCD 1042.

This Continuum presents a program featuring the female vocal ensemble known as “Tapestry”. The Boston-based vocal group was founded by member Laurie Monahan in the 1980s and combines a repertoire of music from the medieval to the contemporary periods. This program features the recordings “Sapphire Night”, “The Fourth River’, and “Song of Songs Come into my Garden”. The so-named Tapestry recordings used are: Musikproduction MDG 344 1193-2, Telarc CD-80534, and Telarc CD

This Continuum program is devoted to the music of the Ars Subtilior (subtle art), an early musical style characterized by rhythmic and notational complexity, centered in Paris, Avignon in southern France, also in northern Spain at the end of the fourteenth century and in southern France in the 14th century. Often the term is used in contrast with Ars Nova, which applies to the musical style of the preceding period from about 1310 to about 1370.

Continuum presents a program devoted to Renaissance music performed on two of the most popular musical instruments of that period, the viola da gamba and, the lute. Performers include Ron McFarlane, Paul O'Dette and the famous Jodi Savall, all well known masters of their instruments.

This week,  Continuum features The Early Music Ensemble Gilles Binchois, now in its thirtieth year of performing medieval church music. The musicians are named after one of the most important composers of the 15th century Burgundian School. Your'll hear them perform Guillaume de Machaut’s 14th century Mass of Notre Dame, the first medieval polyphonic setting of a mass by a known single composer. The setting of this mass is thought to have been composed specifically for the Cathedral of Rheims.

This Continuum presents a program of early English music performed by a unique ensemble known as The King's Noyse, the leading North American Renaissance-style violin, viola and cello ensemble.

One of the major American early music ensembles, The Baltimore Consort, was founded in 1980. On this Continuum your'll hear a wide variety of excerpts from three of their CDs, featuring the female singer, Custer LaRue, who specializes in Renaissance music and traditional Folk music.

A very large repertoire of Sephardic music is available on CD recordings. Continuum is pleased to present a wide selection of Songs of the Sephardim from their library performed by three recognized ensembles who play this music expertly.

This Continuum is a program devoted to the various aspects of medieval love. The performers are three noted ensembles specializing in early music, namely our own New Orleans Musica da Camera, Sequentia and the Boston Camerata. Recordings used are Maiden, Mother, Muse (New Orleans Musica da Camera) - Centaur CRC 2434, Dante and the Troubadours (Sequentia) - Deutsche Harmonia Mundi 05472-7727-2, and Tristan et Iseult (The Boston Camerata) - Erato ECD 75528. 

The Folger Consort is one of the oldest early music ensembles in the U.S. Its home base is the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC containing the largest Shakespeare collection in the world. 

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