Morning Edition

Weekdays starting at 4 a.m.
Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne
Diane Mack

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

With the Marketplace Morning Report at 6:51 a.m., the Marketplace Tech Report at 8:47 a.m., and the GNO Info Minute at 8:59 a.m.

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Politics
9:16 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama Launching China Trade Case

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

President Obama will launch a new trade enforcement case against China Monday, using the power of incumbency to counter Republican Mitt Romney's criticism that he is ceding American jobs to the Asian power.

The Two-Way
7:31 am
Mon September 17, 2012

White House Launching Trade Complaints Against China

A worker inspects auto parts at a factory in Chengdu, China. (2005 file photo.)
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 12:10 pm

"The White House Monday will demand through a world trade panel that China stop subsidizing auto parts made for export," reports Cleveland's Plain Dealer.

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Around the Nation
6:31 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Chicago's O'Hare Needs Help Clearing Brush

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a job opening at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Wanted: One herder with a flock of sheep, or goats are OK too. The Sun Times reports that O'Hare is looking for 25 grazing animals to clear out overgrown bushes surrounding the airport. Those bushes attract birds, which are dangerous to aircraft. O'Hare requires the herder to bring a mobile electronic fence to keep his herd off the runway, though apparently a shepherd's crook is optional. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
6:25 am
Mon September 17, 2012

South Korean Men Embrace Makeup, Skin Care

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. South Korea is a conservative society where men are dominant and also wear lots of makeup. A market research firm finds that this one small nation consumes more than 20 percent of the world's male skin care products. An AP reporter describes women applying lipstick to men, security guards behind layers of makeup and male flight attendants attending makeup class. A popular South Korean catch phrase is: Appearance is power. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Analysis
4:01 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Politics In The News

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Throughout today's program we are following continuing protest in majority Muslim countries. The violence mostly against American facilities is blamed on a video with a mocking portrayal of the Prophet Mohammad. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says he believes the violence is calming down, but he expects the protests will continue for some time.

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Afghanistan
4:01 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Deadly Incidents Take A Toll In Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Protests Continue Against Anti-Islam Film

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We begin this morning in the Middle East. The violent protests outside U.S. diplomatic missions in the region - sparked by a roughly made film insulting Muhammad - have ebbed.

INSKEEP: There is still plenty of tension, and in Kabul today, police held back more than 1,000 people who took to the streets throwing rocks at the police and chanting anti-American slogans.

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NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon September 17, 2012

White House To Launch Trade Case Against China

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A trade dispute between the U.S. and China is at the top of NPR's business news.

The United States has filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization. Washington charges that China subsidizes its cars and auto parts, giving it an unfair trade advantage over U.S. automakers.

This move comes as President Obama campaigns in Ohio today. Ohio is a political swing state and a place where many jobs rely on the auto industry.

NPR Story
3:43 am
Mon September 17, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: kicking the crack berry habit. That's what BlackBerry users at Yahoo are being encouraged to do.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And take up other addictions instead. Over the weekend, Yahoo announced it will buy employees the smartphone of their choice so long as it is not a BlackBerry. The company will however, pick up the tab with a data plan for the brand new iPhone 5 and the yet-to-be-released Windows Phone 8.

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History
2:45 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Antietam: A Savage Day In American History

Between two farm fields in Sharpsburg, Md., there was a sunken road, which Confederates used as a rifle pit until they were overrun by federal troops. The road has since been known as "Bloody Lane."
Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:51 am

On this morning 150 years ago, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the crossroads town of Sharpsburg, Md. The Battle of Antietam remains the bloodiest single day in American history.

The battle left 23,000 men killed or wounded in the fields, woods and dirt roads, and it changed the course of the Civil War.

It is called simply the Cornfield, and it was here, in the first light of dawn that Union troops — more than 1,000 — crept toward the Confederate lines. The stalks were at head level and shielded their movements.

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