Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f96de1c817b26f41489e|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Playlist

March 08, 2013

6:26 PM
Quicc Beat
Artist : Suff Daddy
Album : Suff Sells
Composer :
Label : Melting Pot
WWNO
1:48 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

WATCH: Marketplace Host Kai Ryssdal's Visit To New Orleans

Credit Fat Happy Media

Kai Ryssdal, the Host and Senior Editor of Marketplace — the national business show airing weekdays at 6 p.m. on WWNO — flew in for just one day for a special event at Le Petit Théâtre on May 29.

After a quick meet-and-greet with some of the station’s major donors, Kai sat down with WWNO News Director Eve Troeh for an interview in front of a packed house, and then answered questions from the audience.

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WWNO Presents
11:36 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

An Evening With Kai Ryssdal, Host Of Marketplace

Kai Ryssdal, host of Marketplace.
Credit Marketplace

Thursday — May 29, 2014
7:30 p.m. at Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré

616 Saint Peter Street

-SOLD OUT-

Or call the box office: (504) 522-2081

$15.00

Join WWNO at Le Petit Théâtre as host Eve Troeh discusses Business, Media and… the meaning of life with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal.

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Marketplace
3:20 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

As New Orleans Comes Back, Some Neighborhoods Boom, Others Stay Blighted

A shotgun house in the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans gets new paint.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

About a year ago, Greg Thyssen and Shakti Belway bought an 1800's double shotgun in the Tremé neighborhood.

"I'm tall," Thyssen said, "so I love the high ceilings, a fireplace in every room, beautiful pocket doors."

Beauty, yes, but the house needed work. "The floors were eaten away by termites," Belway said, "and under layers and layers of linoleum."

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Data Visualization
9:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

How Do You Stack Up? Find Out With Marketplace's Income Upshot

Income Upshot, from Marketplace’s Wealth and Poverty Desk, is a data visualization tool that tracks the relationship between what we make and how we live, work and play. It uses data from sources like the U.S. Census Bureau, marketing firms and academic researchers to explore how much someone’s income says about their lifestyle and consumer behavior.

Environment
6:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Levee Board Takes On Oil Industry Over Damage To Delta

New Orleans' levee board is suing energy companies for damaging the Mississippi River delta by cutting canals through the marshland. The canals let in sea water, which kills marshes, eroding the city's protective buffer against storms. A map of the delta.
Frank Relle

 

Eight years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has a new flood protection system — $14 billion of levees, pumps and flood gates built by the Army Corps of Engineers. Residents, though, don't think that will be enough. The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority - East, the local levee board, basically, says that as sea levels rise and wetlands down river get washed away, New Orleans will need more help.

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Marketplace Money
8:00 am
Sat April 14, 2012

Bringing fresh food to everyone in New Orleans

Actor Wendell Pierce is working to bring his own chain of grocery stores to food deserts in New Orleans.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

You loved him as Detective William "Bunk" Moreland on "The Wire." You may also know him as the trombone-playing Antoine Batiste from HBO's "Treme."

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Podcasts

  • Friday, July 11, 2014 4:08pm
    Reynolds and Lorillard, two big cigarette companies, are merging. You might think that with all the bans on smoking in bars, restaurants and public spaces, the cig business would be pretty small these days. But the fact is cigarettes are still huge, including in the US. We look at what this kind of merger means for smokes. Also, the White House is announcing a program to get companies to pay their small-business suppliers faster. Apple, Honda and Coca-Cola are among the 26 companies that have agreed to pay small businesses they contract with for parts and services faster – ideally within 15 days. We ask a small business owner how much of a difference does it make if they get paid a few days or a few weeks sooner. Plus, Eileen Ford, who created the Ford Agency, and along with it the modeling business as we know it—including the Supermodel--died yesterday. We look at how she made modeling an industry. And finally, an an itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny new installment to our "Summer Brought To You By" series.
  • Thursday, July 10, 2014 4:46pm
    News that Chinese hackers broke into databases holding personal information on government employees is confirmation that your information is not safe, whether it be in a bank or a government vault. Now it’s all up to the private sector to protect our information, and that’s creating huge opportunities for data security businesses. Plus, Europe’s troubled economies are in deeper trouble still. Today’s bleak news? Portugal is possibly heading for another banking crisis while manufacturing numbers from France and Italy are simply disappointing. Deflation, contraction, recession. As Europe struggles on, we compare and contrast and ask about the impact, if any, on the U.S. Also, Boeing forecasts an even rosier future for airliner sales, spurred by economic growth in developing countries that it predicts will double the number of annual fliers in 20 years. Most growth will be in Asia. As developing countries become wealthier, the growth in air travel also shows how expanding transportation will add to global carbon emissions. We investigate.
  • Wednesday, July 9, 2014 4:19pm
    Citigroup is close to reaching a $7 billion settlement with the Department of Justice over allegations that it sold shoddy mortgages. The J.P. Morgan Chase settlement back in November was $13 billion, which raises the question: How does the Justice department come up with sich a number? Plus, Alcoa, a mega producer of aluminum, is trying to go the route that other founding U.S. corporations have gone by getting out of the commodity business it was built on and moving into more specialized products with less competition and higher profit margins. Also, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says employers are advertising more jobs. But that doesn’t mean they’re actually doing the hiring for those positions. 
  • Tuesday, July 8, 2014 4:28pm
    After a blaze of success that propelled it into going public, the Crumbs cupcake company is going out of business. We look at the object lessons that other one-product businesses might take from the Crumbs saga. Plus, a new report looks at grads who came out in the early days of the recession and concludes they’ve done just fine. They have, but only because they got in before things really hit the fan. We look behind the numbers. Also, seems Silicon Valley interns get paid a lot of money. Like, six grand a month, in some cases. What do they do to make that kind of cash, and why would any company want to pay an intern that much? We report.  
  • Monday, July 7, 2014 4:05pm
    Banks needing cash temporarily pawn off treasuries to get it – usually just for a day or two. The system is under strain because the Fed has bought so many bonds and also because regulations require many financial institutions to hold bonds as collateral for deals. This is causing deals to fail at unprecedented rates. Plus, Archer Daniels Midland, a major US food processor has agreed to buy a company called Wild Flavors, which specializes in natural flavorings for food products. We pull back the curtain on the business of flavor, and along the way find out about what’s in, what’s out, and the tastes that are trending. Also, some foods are at recent highs, others are cheaper than they’ve been, but overall, the USDA reports, Americans spend far less on food than people in most countries – an average of 6.6 percent of income. Even poor Americans don’t spend appreciably more of their income. We look at what makes food in the U.S. so inexpensive.