The Listening Post

The Listening Post is a community media project that aims to start a conversation about local news in New Orleans. Every week on our radio segment we talk about issues ranging from healthcare to WhoDat, tattoos to transportation.

Listeners can both contribute thoughts and commentary about important issues in their neighborhoods, and also receive important local news and information.

How does it work?

There are two ways to participate in the Listening Post project.

1. We have a Listening Post recording device at Norman Mayer Library in Gentilly where you can answer our questions of the week. Questions solicit opinions about jobs, housing, health care, safety, development and other essential topics. We listen to the recorded answers every week, and share some of the best answers on the radio.

2. We have created a text messaging service that also seeks to connect with local voices by asking questions and sharing information on a weekly basis. Every week we send out a text message survey about a local news issue, and then share the results on the radio. If you would like to participate in our surveys and receive important local news bulletins, text the word "hello" to the Listening Post phone number: (504) 303-4348.

News and information is an essential resource, just like food, housing, and water. The Listening Post is a project that seeks to meet people in person, in their own neighborhoods, and invite them to both consume and contribute information about important issues happening in New Orleans. Our goal is to listen to people and help them get informed about things that matter most in the city.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

The Listening Post is back collecting thoughts and experiences from communities around New Orleans on a new series of issues. The past month we’ve been collaborating with Independent radio producer Eve Abrams and her Unprisoned project. 

An inmate in the new Orleans Parish Prison.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

The Listening Post is teaming up with the Unprisoned project, a new media initiative by award winning independent radio producer Eve Abrams. We want to understand better how jails and prisons impact society here in Louisiana, where 1 in 75 residents are incarcerated, the highest rate in the world.

Happy Holidays.
Jesse Hardman

A recent Pew Research Center report highlighted the fact that the United States is no longer a majority middle income country. We here at the Listening Post thought dropping this report during the holiday season made for some interesting questions.

So, we’re asking folks around New Orleans both how they’re feeling about their place on the economic scale, and how that impacts their gift buying this December.

Ten years ago this week New Orleans was under water. A decade later, people who survived the flood are still turning to art to make sense of Hurricane Katrina’s fury.

Several of the city’s major museums have acknowledged the anniversary with new exhibits, including one at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Undeterred by the devastation, second line clubs returned to New Orleans a few months after the flood, determined to uphold the city's cultural traditions. This photo is of the 2009 Prince of Wales second line parade.
Jason Saul

Well, we’ve made it. Almost. It’s been a long, hot summer and this is our last episode as we come up on the tenth anniversary of Katrina.

The city is abuzz with journalists and experts and NGOs and politicians. We thought we’d use this last bit of The Debris to explore a word they’re all using to talk about New Orleans: resilience.

Jesse Hardman

The Listening Post has teamed up with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune to produce a segment called Street Wise. First, we head out to the hardest-to-pronounce streets in New Orleans, then we hit up a linguist for a little background. 

So, how do you pronounce Chartres?

CharTRE, très chic!

How do New Orleanians pronounce the street name Melpomene?
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The Listening Post has teamed up with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune to produce a segment called Street Wise. First, we head out to the hardest-to-pronounce streets in New Orleans, then we hit up a linguist for a little background. 

So, how do you pronounce Melpomene?

Where da Melph at?

We took our Listening Post out to Tchoupitoulas Street to hear how New Orleanians and tourists alike pronounce the notoriously confusing street name.
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The Listening Post has teamed up with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune to produce a segment called Street Wise. First, we head out to the hardest-to-pronounce streets in New Orleans, then we hit up a linguist for a little background. 

"Global Warming is a Hoax" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BzItCPk5j4

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores the politics of climate change in Louisiana.

Jesse Hardman

Recently Louisiana senators David Vitter and Bill Cassidy signed a letter asking that FEMA eliminate the requirement that states address climate change in disaster planning to receive federal funding. Read the full letter here

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