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Tens of thousands in Louisiana were surprised by floods last week. In a changing climate, what more can be done to warn communities that the weather can do things they aren't used to?

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The cleanup continues after record floods devastated Louisiana. Relief organizations are on the ground in, trying to help thousands of victims of the floods that devastated Baton Rouge. But some in a downtown shelter say it is not enough. Mallory Falk of WWNO found out that many are renters, and some would like to leave the area altogether.

About 200 people gathered at The Pavilion of the Two Sisters in City Park on Sunday for a memorial to cultural activist Sharon Litwin. 

  Leaders of the groups she helped over the years turned out to honor the British native who embraced New Orleans.

Louisiana is entering recovery mode after devastating flooding killed 13 people and damaged at least 60,000 homes across 20 parishes.

But as Louisana Gov. John Bel Edwards told CNN, that process is "going to take many months." He added that even though this flooding was "unprecedented and historic," many are "just now realizing how significant it was."

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The storms that inundated Louisiana this week did not have names, and they were not hurricanes. Nonetheless, officials are calling the Louisiana rain and floods the biggest U.S. natural disaster since Superstorm Sandy.

In California, wildfires have charred more than 350 square miles so far this year, and fire season hasn’t yet hit its peak.

On the same day Donald Trump was touring areas of Louisiana affected by record flooding, the White House announced President Obama will be heading to Louisiana, too.

Here was the White House's statement released Friday afternoon:

Devastating floods in Louisiana have left an estimated 40,000 houses damaged; some 86,000 people have applied for federal disaster aid in the wake of the disaster.

It's a crisis some people are comparing to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

The disaster area stretches over 20 parishes, Eileen Fleming of member station WWNO reports, and officials are working to determine how to provide temporary housing to meet the extreme need.

As flooding drenches parts of southern Louisiana, the city of New Orleans is sending help. 

Even as thousands of residents of southern Louisiana are returning to their flood-damaged homes, more danger could lie ahead as rain continues to fall and the full extent of the damage can't be known, according to state emergency response officials.

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