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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Surprising Questions On Your Next Job Interview

With the economy on the upswing and the job market getting stronger–why is it taking so much longer these days to get hired? A survey of job seekers from glassdoor.com found that since 2009 the time it takes from application to actually hearing about whether or not you got the job –has more than doubled. It now averages 23 days.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

529 Muslim Brotherhood Members Sentenced To Death

Today, an Egyptian court issued a verdict sentencing 529 members of the Muslim Brotherhood to death. It is the largest mass death penalty verdict issued in the country’s history.

Additionally, 700 more members – including the Brotherhood’s leader – were put on trial for charges that included murder.

NPR’s Cairo correspondent Leila Fadel joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the mass sentencing.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Native Alaskans Still Reeling 25 Years After Exxon-Valdez Oil Spill

Cleanup workers scrub large rocks on the oil-covered beach of Naked Island on Prince Williams Sound on April 2, 1989 a week after the beginning of an oil disaster which occurred when the tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground March 24, 1989. (Chris Wilkins/ /AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 9:29 am

Twenty-five years ago today, an Exxon tanker carrying 53 million gallons of oil through a channel in Alaska’s Prince William Sound struck a reef and spilled about 11 million gallons of crude oil into the environment.

The oil spill killed thousands of animals in the pristine environment, devastated the salmon and herring fisheries and profoundly affected the way of life for native Alaskans in the area.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

A Trick For Bending The Laws Of Physics

You see it on T.V. all the time: cops interrogating a suspect in a cramped room while prosecutors watch from the other side of a one-way mirror.

The prosecutors can see in, but the suspects can’t see out.

Those mirrors are specially coated and lighting is used to create the one-way illusion.

Now engineers at the University of Texas in Austin have figured out how to create a one-way illusion with sound.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matt Largey of KUT in Austin explains.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Houston Ship Channel Expected To Reopen

The Coast Guard could soon reopen the Houston Ship Channel that was the scene of an oil spill over the weekend.

The channel is one of the nation’s busiest seaports. Coast Guard Warrant Officer Kimberly Smith says the goal is to reopen part of it sometime Monday. The closure has forced more than 80 ships to wait to enter or leave the bay.

Smith says officials are still trying to determine how much oil spilled Saturday, when a barge carrying about 900,000 gallons collided with a ship. Authorities initially said as much as a fifth of the barge’s cargo spilled.

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Search Effort Continues In Washington Mudslide

A house sits destroyed in the mud on Highway 530 next to mile marker 37 on March 23, 2014 near Arlington, Washington. (Lindsey Wasson/The Seattle Times via Getty Images)

There are concerns that the number of deaths from a mudslide over the weekend in Washington state will climb far above the eight people who’ve been confirmed dead so far.

A 1-square-mile mudslide on Saturday swept through part of a former fishing village about 55 miles north of Seattle. The list of people who’ve been reported missing or who are unaccounted for contains 108 names — but authorities say that figure will probably decline dramatically.

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Coffee
3:30 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Shortage Of Coffee Beans Is Causing Prices To Skyrocket

Coffee prices have doubled since January due in part to a drought in Brazil, the world's largest coffee producer. (Stirling Noyes/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 1:56 pm

First, it was bacon — the savory breakfast treat is much more expensive due to a virus found in pigs. Now, it’s your daily cup of Joe.

Coffee, which more than 80 percent of Americans consume, has more than doubled in price since January.

The rise is partly due to a major shortage of coffee in Brazil — the world’s largest producer of coffee beans — because of a severe drought there.

But where you buy your daily cup will determine whether you have noticed whether you are paying a lot more for it or not.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Kate Burton Finds Success On Both Coasts

Kate Burton in the role of Irina Arkadina in the Huntington Theatre Company’s production of Anton Chekhov’s “The Seagull.” (T. Charles Erickson)

Kate Burton has appeared in dozens of T.V. shows in in her decades-long career, but it was “Grey’s Anatomy” that really put her career into overdrive.

As she tells Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer, “It changed my life as an actress.”

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Praise For 'Particle Fever'

Full view of the open ATLAS Detector. (particlefever.com)

Director Mark Levinson’s gripping documentary, “Particle Fever,” follows a group of physicists on their colossal endeavor to find a minuscule particle – the Higgs boson.

Often referred to as “the God particle”, the Higgs boson is a subatomic morsel many physicists believe to hold the key to understanding the universe. Essentially, finding it would either confirm or deny everything we know about the cosmos.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Ukrainians Remain Uneasy In Kiev

People pay their respects at a makeshift memorial where a protester was killed during clashes with police near Independence Square The Ukrainian government has promised justice for the fallen, but citizens in Kiev remain uneasy. (Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images)

As Russia consolidates its control over Crimea and international sanctions intensify, it is easy to forget the traumatic events that took place in the Ukrainian capital Kiev exactly one month ago.

The new Ukrainian government is promising justice for the murder of at least eighty protesters, killed by gunmen in and around Independence Square. But as the BBC’s Chris Morris reports from Kiev, many people remain wary.

Note: Please subscribe to the Here & Now podcast to hear this BBC report.

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